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The effects of secondary markets for government bonds on inflation dynamics

Author

Listed:
  • Begona Dominguez

    (University of Queensland)

  • Pedro Gomis-Porqueras

    (Deakin University)

Abstract

We analyze how trading in secondary markets for public debt changes the inherent links between monetary and fiscal policy, by studying both inflation and debt dynamics. When agents do not trade in these markets, there exists a unique monetary steady state and traditional passive/active policy prescriptions deliver locally determinate equilibria. In contrast, when agents trade in secondary markets and bonds are scarce, there exists a liquidity premium on public debt and bonds affect inflation dynamics and vice versa. In this monetary equilibrium, the government budget constraint can be satisfied for different combinations of inflation and debt. Thus, self-fulfilling beliefs that deliver multiple steady states are possible. Moreover, traditional passive/active policy prescriptions are not always useful in delivering locally determinate equilibria. However, monetary and fiscal policies can be used as an equilibrium selection device. We find that active monetary policies are more likely to deliver real and nominal determinacy when the long-run inflation target is low. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Begona Dominguez & Pedro Gomis-Porqueras, 2019. "The effects of secondary markets for government bonds on inflation dynamics," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 32, pages 249-273, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:18-50
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2018.10.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:dyncon:v:89:y:2018:i:c:p:183-199 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Marco Bassetto & Wei Cui, 2018. "The Fiscal Theory of the Price Level in an Environment of Low Interest Rates," 2018 Meeting Papers 574, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Bassetto, Marco & Cui, Wei, 2018. "The fiscal theory of the price level in a world of low interest rates," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 5-22.
    4. Andolfatto, David & Martin, Fernando M., 2018. "Monetary policy and liquid government debt," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 183-199.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Taxes; Inflation; Secondary markets; Liquidity premium;

    JEL classification:

    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General
    • E61 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Policy Objectives; Policy Designs and Consistency; Policy Coordination
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H21 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Efficiency; Optimal Taxation

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