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Asymmetric Expectation Effects of Regime Shifts in Monetary Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Zheng Liu

    (Emory University)

  • Daniel Waggoner

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta)

  • Tao Zha

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta)

Abstract

This paper addresses two substantive issues: (1) Does the magnitude of the expectation effect of regime switching in monetary policy depend on a particular policy regime? (2) Under which regime is the expectation effect quantitatively important? Using two canonical DSGE models, we show that there exists asymmetry in the expectation effect across regimes. The expectation effect under the dovish policy regime is quantitatively more important than that under the hawkish regime. These results suggest that the possibility of regime shifts in monetary policy can have important effects on rational agents' expectation formation and on equilibrium dynamics. They offer a theoretical explanation for the empirical possibility that a policy shift from the dovish regime to the hawkish regime may not be the main source of substantial reductions in the volatilities of inflation and output. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Zheng Liu & Daniel Waggoner & Tao Zha, 2009. "Asymmetric Expectation Effects of Regime Shifts in Monetary Policy," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 12(2), pages 284-303, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:08-80
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2008.10.001
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Rational expectation; Imperfect credibility; Inflation; Monetary policy; Macroeconomic volatility; Lucas critique;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E42 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Monetary Sytsems; Standards; Regimes; Government and the Monetary System
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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