IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cfm/wpaper/1719.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Macroeconomic Effects of Delayed Capital Liquidation

Author

Listed:
  • Wei Cui

    () (Department of Economics University College London (UCL)
    Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM))

Abstract

This paper studies macroeconomic effects of financial shocks through the lens of delayed capital liquidation and reallocation among firms. I develop a model in which firms face idiosyncratic productivity risks, financial constraints, and random liquidation costs. Liquidation costs generate an option value of staying and a liquidation delay for unproductive firms. A novel feature arising from the delay is that unproductive firms have a higher debt-to-asset ratio than productive ones. I find that adverse financial shocks that tighten financial constraints can raise the option value. The financial shocks also have general equilibrium effects that further raise the option value and delay capital liquidation. Capital is thus persistently misallocated, leading to a long-lasting economic contraction. Using U.S. data from 1971-2015, I show that financial shocks can explain almost 67% of the variation in the capital liquidation-to-expenditures ratio and 72% of the variation in output

Suggested Citation

  • Wei Cui, 2017. "Macroeconomic Effects of Delayed Capital Liquidation," Discussion Papers 1719, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).
  • Handle: RePEc:cfm:wpaper:1719
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.centreformacroeconomics.ac.uk/Discussion-Papers/2017/CFMDP2017-19-Paper.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Clausen, Andrew & Strub, Carlo, 2013. "A General and Intuitive Envelope Theorem," SIRE Discussion Papers 2015-43, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    2. Andrea Lanteri, 2018. "The Market for Used Capital: Endogenous Irreversibility and Reallocation over the Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 108(9), pages 2383-2419, September.
    3. Oliver Hart & John Moore, 1994. "A Theory of Debt Based on the Inalienability of Human Capital," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(4), pages 841-879.
    4. Andrea Ajello, 2016. "Financial Intermediation, Investment Dynamics, and Business Cycle Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(8), pages 2256-2303, August.
    5. Vojislav Maksimovic & Gordon Phillips, 2001. "The Market for Corporate Assets: Who Engages in Mergers and Asset Sales and Are There Efficiency Gains?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(6), pages 2019-2065, December.
    6. Avinash K. Dixit & Robert S. Pindyck, 1994. "Investment under Uncertainty," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 5474, March.
    7. Soren Radde & Wei Cui, 2015. "Search-Based Endogenous Illiquidity and the Macroeconomy," 2015 Meeting Papers 546, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Andrew Clausen & Carlo Strub, 2012. "Envelope theorems for non-smooth and non-concave optimization," ECON - Working Papers 062, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    9. Tauchen, George, 1986. "Finite state markov-chain approximations to univariate and vector autoregressions," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 177-181.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Wright, Randall & Xiao, Sylvia Xiaolin & Zhu, Yu, 2018. "Frictional capital reallocation I: Ex ante heterogeneity," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 100-116.
    2. Fukui, Masao, 2018. "Asset Quality Cycles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 97-108.
    3. Andrea L. Eisfeldt & Yu Shi, 2018. "Capital Reallocation," NBER Working Papers 25085, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial constraints and financial shocks; Capital liquidation; Option value of staying;

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cfm:wpaper:1719. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Martin Hannon). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cmlseuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.