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Will Assets be Stranded or Bailed Out? Expectations of Investors in the Face of Climate Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Suphi Sen
  • Marie-Theres von Schickfus

Abstract

The goal to keep global warming below 2°C implies that many energy-sector assets are at risk of becoming stranded. This paper investigates whether and how investors price in stranded asset risk due to climate policy. We exploit the gradual development of a German climate policy proposal aimed at reducing electricity production from coal and analyze its effect on the valuation of energy utilities. We find that investors do care about stranded asset risk due to climate policy, but that they also expect a financial compensation policy for their stranded assets. We show that these results are not driven by contemporaneous confounding events.

Suggested Citation

  • Suphi Sen & Marie-Theres von Schickfus, 2017. "Will Assets be Stranded or Bailed Out? Expectations of Investors in the Face of Climate Policy," ifo Working Paper Series 238, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ifowps:_238
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    File URL: https://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/wp-2017-238-sen-schickfus-climate-policy.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stefano Carattini & Suphi Sen, 2019. "Carbon Taxes and Stranded Assets: Evidence from Washington State," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1910, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Stranded assets; climate policy;

    JEL classification:

    • Q35 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Hydrocarbon Resources
    • Q38 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy (includes OPEC Policy)
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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