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Time for Transition - an exploratory study of the transition to a carbon-neutral economy

Author

Listed:
  • Diederik Dicou
  • Saskia van Ewijk
  • Jan Kakes
  • Martijn Regelink
  • Guido Schotten

Abstract

Economic activity and energy consumption are inextricably linked. Given this, changes in energy systems can have a major impact on the economy and financial stability. This is particularly true in the case of the Netherlands, which is still dependent on polluting energy sources to a significant extent. We are currently in the early stage of a major energy transition: the global challenge of switching to a carbon-neutral energy system in time.

Suggested Citation

  • Diederik Dicou & Saskia van Ewijk & Jan Kakes & Martijn Regelink & Guido Schotten, 2016. "Time for Transition - an exploratory study of the transition to a carbon-neutral economy," DNB Occasional Studies 1402, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:dnb:dnbocs:1402
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    File URL: https://www.dnb.nl/en/binaries/tt_tcm47-338545.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Suphi Sen & Marie-Theres von Schickfus, 2017. "Will Assets be Stranded or Bailed Out? Expectations of Investors in the Face of Climate Policy," ifo Working Paper Series 238, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.

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