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Doves for the Rich, Hawks for the Poor? Distributional Consequences of Systematic Monetary Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Nils Gornemann

    (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, International Finance Division, Washington, D.C. 20551)

  • Keith Kuester

    (University of Bonn, Adenauerallee 24-42, 53113 Bonn, Germany)

  • Makoto Nakajima

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, Ten Independence Mall, Philadelphia, PA 19106-1574)

Abstract

We build a New Keynesian business-cycle model with rich household heterogeneity. In the model, systematic monetary stabilization policy affects the distribution of income, income risks, and the demand for funds and supply of assets: the demand, because matching frictions render idiosyncratic labor-market risk endogenous; the supply, because markups, adjustment costs, and the tax system mean that the average profitability of firms is endogenous. Disagreement about systematic monetary stabilization policy is pronounced. The wealth rich or retired tend to favor inflation targeting. The wealth-poor working class, instead, favors unemployment-centric policy. One- and two-agent alternatives can show unanimous disapproval of inflation-centric policy, instead. We highlight how the political support for inflation-centric policy depends on wage setting, the tax system, and the portfolio that households have.

Suggested Citation

  • Nils Gornemann & Keith Kuester & Makoto Nakajima, 2021. "Doves for the Rich, Hawks for the Poor? Distributional Consequences of Systematic Monetary Policy," ECONtribute Discussion Papers Series 089, University of Bonn and University of Cologne, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:ajk:ajkdps:089
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Doves for the Rich, Hawks for the Poor? Distributional Consequences of Systematic Monetary Policy
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2021-05-18 17:16:37

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    Cited by:

    1. R. Anton Braun & Daisuke Ikeda, 2021. "Monetary Policy over the Lifecycle," IMES Discussion Paper Series 21-E-09, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary Policy; Unemployment; Search and Matching; Heterogeneous Agents; General Equilibrium; Dual Mandate;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian; Modern Monetary Theory
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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