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When Inequality Matters for Macro and Macro Matters for Inequality

Author

Listed:
  • Ahn, SeHyoun
  • Kaplan, Greg
  • Moll, Benjamin
  • Winberry, Thomas
  • Wolf, Christian

Abstract

We develop an efficient and easy-to-use computational method for solving a wide class of general equilibrium heterogeneous agent models with aggregate shocks, together with an open source suite of codes that implement our algorithms in an easy-to-use toolbox. Our method extends standard linearization techniques and is designed to work in cases when inequality matters for the dynamics of macroeconomic aggregates. We present two applications that analyze a two-asset incomplete markets model parameterized to match the distribution of income, wealth, and marginal propensities to consume. First, we show that our model is consistent with two key features of aggregate consumption dynamics that are difficult to match with representative agent models: (i) the sensitivity of aggregate consumption to predictable changes in aggregate income and (ii) the relative smoothness of aggregate consumption. Second, we extend the model to feature capital-skill complementarity and show how factor-specific productivity shocks shape dynamics of income and consumption inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Ahn, SeHyoun & Kaplan, Greg & Moll, Benjamin & Winberry, Thomas & Wolf, Christian, 2017. "When Inequality Matters for Macro and Macro Matters for Inequality," CEPR Discussion Papers 12123, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12123
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    14. Christian Bayer & Ralph Luetticke & Lien Pham‐Dao & Volker Tjaden, 2019. "Precautionary Savings, Illiquid Assets, and the Aggregate Consequences of Shocks to Household Income Risk," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 87(1), pages 255-290, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ralph Luetticke, 2018. "Transmission of Monetary Policy with Heterogeneity in Household Portfolios," Discussion Papers 1819, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).
    2. Boppart, Timo & Krusell, Per & Mitman, Kurt, 2018. "Exploiting MIT shocks in heterogeneous-agent economies: the impulse response as a numerical derivative," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 68-92.
    3. KITAO Sagiri & YAMADA Tomoaki, 2019. "Dimensions of Inequality in Japan: Distributions of Earnings, Income and Wealth between 1984 and 2014," Discussion papers 19034, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    4. Klaus Adam & Henning Weber, 2019. "Optimal Trend Inflation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 109(2), pages 702-737, February.
    5. Drechsel-Grau, Moritz & Greimel, Fabian, 2018. "Falling Behind: Has Rising Inequality Fueled the American Debt Boom?," Annual Conference 2018 (Freiburg, Breisgau): Digital Economy 181585, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Michael Reiter, 2019. "Solving Heterogeneous Agent Models with Non-convex Optimization Problems: Linearization and Beyond %," 2019 Meeting Papers 1048, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Anmol Bhandari & David Evans & Mikhail Golosov & Thomas J. Sargent, 2018. "Inequality, Business Cycles, and Monetary-Fiscal Policy," NBER Working Papers 24710, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Adam, Klaus & Weber, Henning, 2017. "Optimal Trend Inflation," CEPR Discussion Papers 12160, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. repec:eee:dyncon:v:89:y:2018:i:c:p:93-99 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:eee:ecmode:v:79:y:2019:i:c:p:74-85 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Moritz Drechsel-Grau & Fabian Greimel, 2018. "Falling Behind: Has Rising Inequality Fueled the American Debt Boom?," 2018 Meeting Papers 1032, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A1 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics
    • C0 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General
    • E0 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General
    • F0 - International Economics - - General
    • G0 - Financial Economics - - General
    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General

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