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Monetary policy when households have debt: new evidence on the transmission mechanism

Author

Listed:
  • Cloyne, James

    () (Bank of England)

  • Ferreira, Clodomiro

    () (London Business School)

  • Surico, Paolo

    () (London Business School and CEPR)

Abstract

In response to an interest rate change, mortgagors in the United Kingdom and United States adjust their spending significantly (especially on durable goods) but outright home-owners do not. While the dollar change in mortgage payments is nearly three times larger in the United Kingdom than in the United States, these magnitudes are much smaller than the overall change in expenditure. In contrast, the income change is sizable and similar across both household groups and countries. Consistent with the predictions of a simple heterogeneous agents model with credit-constrained households and multi-period fixed-rate debt contracts, our evidence suggests that the general equilibrium effect of monetary policy on income is quantitatively more important than the direct effect on cash flows.

Suggested Citation

  • Cloyne, James & Ferreira, Clodomiro & Surico, Paolo, 2016. "Monetary policy when households have debt: new evidence on the transmission mechanism," Bank of England working papers 589, Bank of England.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:boeewp:0589
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary policy; mortgage debt; liquidity constraints;

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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