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The Transmission of Monetary Policy through Redistributions and Durable Purchases

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  • Sterk, Vincent
  • Tenreyro, Silvana

Abstract

The central explanation for how monetary policy transmits to the real economy relies critically on nominal rigidities, which form the basis of the New Keynesian (NK) framework. This paper studies a different transmission mechanism that operates even in the absence of nominal rigidities. We show that in an OLG setting, standard open market operations (OMO) carried by central banks have important revaluation effects that alter the level and distribution of wealth and the incentives to work and save for retirement. Specifically, expansionary OMO lead households to front-load their purchases of durable goods and work and save more, thus generating a temporary boom in durables, followed by a bust. The mechanism can account for the empirical responses of key macroeconomic variables to monetary policy interventions. Moreover, the model implies that different monetary interventions (e.g., OMO versus helicopter drops) can have different qualitative effects on activity. The mechanism can thus complement the NK paradigm. We study an extension of the model incorporating labor market frictions.

Suggested Citation

  • Sterk, Vincent & Tenreyro, Silvana, 2015. "The Transmission of Monetary Policy through Redistributions and Durable Purchases," CEPR Discussion Papers 10785, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10785
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    Cited by:

    1. Gianluca Violante & Benjamin Moll & Greg Kaplan, 2015. "Monetary Policy According to HANK," 2015 Meeting Papers 1507, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Silvana Tenreyro & Gregory Thwaites, 2016. "Pushing on a String: US Monetary Policy Is Less Powerful in Recessions," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 43-74, October.
    3. Cloyne, James & Ferreira, Clodomiro & Surico, Paolo, 2015. "Monetary Policy when Households have Debt: New Evidence on the Transmission Mechanism," CEPR Discussion Papers 11023, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Roine Vestman & Matilda Kilström & Josef Sigurdsson & Martin Floden, 2016. "Household Debt and Monetary Policy: Revealing the Cash-Flow Channel," 2016 Meeting Papers 1015, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Galo Nuño & Carlos Thomas, 2016. "Optimal monetary policy with heterogeneous agents," Working Papers 1624, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    6. Kurt Mitman & Iourii Manovskii & Marcus Hagedorn, 2017. "Monetary Policy in Incomplete Market Models: Theory and Evidence," 2017 Meeting Papers 1605, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    durable goods; monetary policy; open market operations; redistributive effects of monetary policy; transmission mechanism;

    JEL classification:

    • E1 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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