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Aggregate Implications of Wealth Redistribution: The Case of Inflation

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  • Matthias Doepke

    (UCLA)

  • Martin Schneider

    (NYU and Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis)

Abstract

This paper shows that a zero-sum redistribution of wealth within a country can have persistent aggregate effects. Motivated by the caseof an unanticipated inflation episode, we consider redistribution shocks that shift resources from old to young households. Aggregate effects arise because there are asymmetries in the reaction of winners and losers to changes in wealth. We focus on two sources of asymmetries: Differences in the average age of winners and losers, and differences in their labor force status. (JEL: D31, D58, E31, E50) (c) 2006 by the European Economic Association.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Matthias Doepke & Martin Schneider, 2006. "Aggregate Implications of Wealth Redistribution: The Case of Inflation," UCLA Economics Working Papers 846, UCLA Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:cla:uclawp:846
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    File URL: http://www.econ.ucla.edu/workingpapers/wp846.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Seghezza, Elena & Morelli, Pierluigi, 2014. "Conflict inflation and delayed stabilization," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, pages 171-184.
    2. Yann Algan & Edouard Challe & Xavier Ragot, 2011. "Incomplete markets and the output–inflation tradeoff," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 46(1), pages 55-84, January.
    3. Adam, Klaus & Tzamourani, Panagiota, 2016. "Distributional consequences of asset price inflation in the Euro Area," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 172-192.
    4. Nils Gornemann & Keith Kuester & Makoto Nakajima, 2012. "Monetary policy with heterogeneous agents," Working Papers 12-21, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    5. Matthias Doepke & Martin Schneider, 2017. "Money as a Unit of Account," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 85, pages 1537-1574, September.
    6. Kryvtsov, Oleksiy & Shukayev, Malik & Ueberfeldt, Alexander, 2011. "Optimal monetary policy under incomplete markets and aggregate uncertainty: A long-run perspective," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(7), pages 1045-1060, July.
    7. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/8881 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Kondor, Péter & Köszegi, Botond, 2015. "Cursed financial innovation," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2015-306, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    9. Matthias Doepke & Martin Schneider, 2006. "Inflation and the Redistribution of Nominal Wealth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 114(6), pages 1069-1097, December.
    10. Rodrigo Lluberas & Juan Odriozola, 2015. "Inflation, currency depreciation and households balance sheet in Uruguay," Documentos de trabajo 2015009, Banco Central del Uruguay.
    11. Meh, Césaire A. & Quadrini, Vincenzo & Terajima, Yaz, 2015. "Limited Nominal Indexation of Optimal Financial Contracts," CEPR Discussion Papers 10330, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E50 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - General

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