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Monetary policy with heterogeneous agents

Listed author(s):
  • Nils Gornemann
  • Keith Kuester
  • Makoto Nakajima

We build a New Keynesian model in which heterogeneous workers differ with regard to their employment status due to search and matching frictions in the labor market, their potential labor income, and their amount of savings. We use this laboratory to quantitatively assess who stands to win or lose from unanticipated monetary accommodation and who benefits most from systematic monetary stabilization policy. We find substantial redistribution effects of monetary policy shocks; a contractionary monetary policy shock increases income and welfare of the wealthiest 5 percent, while the remaining 95 percent experience lower income and welfare. Consequently, the negative effect of a contractionary monetary policy shock to social welfare is larger if heterogeneity is taken into account.

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia in its series Working Papers with number 12-21.

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Date of creation: 2012
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedpwp:12-21
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