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Facts on the distributions of earnings, income, and wealth in the United States: 2007 update

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  • Javier Diaz-Gimenez
  • Andrew Glover
  • José-Víctor Ríos-Rull

Abstract

This article is largely a description of inequality of earnings, income, and wealth in the United States in 2007 as measured by the Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF). We look at inequality in relation to various characteristics such as age, education, employment status, marital status, and whether households are late payers or include bankruptcy filers. We also look at economic mobility. We compare these variables in 2007 with their values in our earlier study in 1998.

Suggested Citation

  • Javier Diaz-Gimenez & Andrew Glover & José-Víctor Ríos-Rull, 2011. "Facts on the distributions of earnings, income, and wealth in the United States: 2007 update," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedmqr:y:2011:n:v.34no.1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Slesnick, Daniel T, 1992. "Aggregate Consumption and Saving in the Postwar United States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(4), pages 585-597, November.
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