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Inferring Labor Income Risk from Economic Choices: An Indirect Inference Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Tony Smith

    (Yale Univ.)

  • M. Fatih Guvenen

    (Univ. of Texas at Austin)

Abstract

borrowing constraints and risk-averse households. In this estimation, we account for measurement error in both consumption and income and we use an auxiliary model---which forms the bridge between the data and the consumption-savings model---that provides a sharp distinction between the RIP and HIP models. Finally, we conduct formal statistical tests to assess the extent to which the RIP and HIP models find support in the data.

Suggested Citation

  • Tony Smith & M. Fatih Guvenen, 2007. "Inferring Labor Income Risk from Economic Choices: An Indirect Inference Approach," 2007 Meeting Papers 1024, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed007:1024
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jonathan Heathcote & Fabrizio Perri & Giovanni L. Violante, 2010. "Unequal We Stand: An Empirical Analysis of Economic Inequality in the United States: 1967-2006," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 13(1), pages 15-51, January.
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    9. Haider, Steven J, 2001. "Earnings Instability and Earnings Inequality of Males in the United States: 1967-1991," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(4), pages 799-836, October.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • D52 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Incomplete Markets
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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