IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fip/fedgfe/2014-09.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Human Capital and Unemployment Dynamics: Why More Educated Workers Enjoy Greater Employment Stability

Author

Listed:
  • Cairo, Isabel

    () (Universitat Pompeu Fabra)

  • Cajner, Tomaz

    () (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.))

Abstract

Why do more educated workers experience lower unemployment rates and lower employment volatility? A closer look at the data reveals that these workers have similar job finding rates, but much lower and less volatile separation rates than their less educated peers. We argue that on-the-job training, being complementary to formal education, is the reason for this pattern. Using a search and matching model with endogenous separations, we show that investments in match-specific human capital reduce the outside option of workers, implying less incentives to separate. The model generates unemployment dynamics that are quantitatively consistent with the cross-sectional empirical patterns.

Suggested Citation

  • Cairo, Isabel & Cajner, Tomaz, 2013. "Human Capital and Unemployment Dynamics: Why More Educated Workers Enjoy Greater Employment Stability," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2014-9, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2014-09
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/feds/2014/201409/201409pap.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Marcus Hagedorn & Iourii Manovskii, 2008. "The Cyclical Behavior of Equilibrium Unemployment and Vacancies Revisited," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1692-1706, September.
    2. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1994. "Minimum Wages and Employment: A Case Study of the Fast-Food Industry in New Jersey and Pennsylvania," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 772-793, September.
    3. JuanJ. Dolado & Marcel Jansen & JuanF. Jimeno, 2009. "On-the-Job Search in a Matching Model with Heterogeneous Jobs and Workers," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(534), pages 200-228, January.
    4. Francisco M. Gonzalez & Shouyong Shi, 2010. "An Equilibrium Theory of Learning, Search, and Wages," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 78(2), pages 509-537, March.
    5. Costain, James S. & Reiter, Michael, 2008. "Business cycles, unemployment insurance, and the calibration of matching models," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 1120-1155, April.
    6. van Ours, J C & Ridder, G, 1993. "Vacancy Durations: Search or Selection?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 55(2), pages 187-198, May.
    7. Karen Kopecky & Richard Suen, 2010. "Finite State Markov-chain Approximations to Highly Persistent Processes," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 13(3), pages 701-714, July.
    8. Thomas Lemieux, 2006. "Increasing Residual Wage Inequality: Composition Effects, Noisy Data, or Rising Demand for Skill?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(3), pages 461-498, June.
    9. Jaeger, David A, 1997. "Reconciling the Old and New Census Bureau Education Questions: Recommendations for Researchers," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 15(3), pages 300-309, July.
    10. Christopher A. Pissarides, 2000. "Equilibrium Unemployment Theory, 2nd Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262161877, January.
    11. Silva, José Ignacio & Toledo, Manuel, 2009. "Labor Turnover Costs And The Cyclical Behavior Of Vacancies And Unemployment," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 13(S1), pages 76-96, May.
    12. Topel, Robert H, 1991. "Specific Capital, Mobility, and Wages: Wages Rise with Job Seniority," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(1), pages 145-176, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Competition & working conditions
      by chris in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2015-03-29 17:25:34

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Erin Wolcott, 2018. "Employment Inequality: Why Do the Low-Skilled Work Less Now?," 2018 Meeting Papers 487, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Jordi Galí & Thijs van Rens, 2008. "The vanishing procyclicality of labor productivity," Economics Working Papers 1230, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jul 2010.
    3. Marcin Bielecki, 2017. "Long shadows of financial shocks: an endogenous growth perspective," Working Papers 2017-22, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    4. Robert Dixon & G. C. Lim & Jan C. van Ours, 2016. "Revisiting Okun’s Relationship," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2016n14, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Gali, Jordi & van Rens, Thijs, 2014. "The Vanishing Procyclicality of Labor Productivity," Economic Research Papers 270221, University of Warwick - Department of Economics.
    6. Nellie Zhao & Henry Hyatt & Isabel Cairo, 2016. "The U.S. Job Ladder and the Low-Wage Jobs of the New Millennium," 2016 Meeting Papers 1414, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Marcin Bielecki, 2017. "Innovation and endogenous growth over business cycle with frictional labor markets," Working Papers 2017-26, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    8. Jung Hyun Choi & Richard K. Green, 2014. "Human Capital Spillovers and Local Unemployment," Working Paper 9319, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    9. Laureys, Lien, 2014. "The cost of human capital depreciation during unemployment," Bank of England working papers 505, Bank of England.
    10. J.I.Lopez & V. Olivella Moppett, 2014. "Financial Shocks and the Cyclical Behavior of Skilled and Unskilled Unemployment," Working papers 496, Banque de France.
    11. repec:cmj:seapas:y:2017:i:15:p:363-371 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Tomaz Cajner & Isabel Cairo, 2013. "The Fading Dynamism of the US Labor Market: The Role of Demographics," 2013 Meeting Papers 1208, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    13. Fang, Lei & Nie, Jun, 2014. "Human Capital Dynamics and the U.S. Labor Market," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2014-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    14. Laureys, Lien, 2014. "The cost of human capital depreciation during unemployment," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86337, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    15. Jan Eeckhout & Korie Amberger, 2017. "Labor Market Liquidity," 2017 Meeting Papers 839, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Unemployment; education; on-the-job training; specific human capital;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2014-09. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (FRB Librarian). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/frbgvus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.