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Trade Policy Implications of Carbon Labels on Food

  • Baddeley, Shane
  • Cheng, Peter
  • Wolfe, Robert
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    Despite the presence of food miles labels and carbon labels on the market for many years, relatively little data is available on how consumers respond to these labels. It is one thing to show people saying in surveys they will use carbon labels, and quite another to have evidence of people actually using them. Carbon labels could be complicated to develop and implement fairly, with significant burdens on producers, especially in developing countries. If the only problem that a carbon label solves is relieving the bad conscience of rich western consumers, then they will be a disaster. Tackling climate change is too urgent to waste time and resources on anything that may prove to be a sideshow.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/122740
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    Paper provided by Canadian Agricultural Trade Policy Research Network in its series Commissioned Papers with number 122740.

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    Date of creation: Oct 2011
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:catpcp:122740
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.catrade.org/

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    13. Dan Ciuriak & Beverly Lapham & Robert Wolfe & Terry Collins-Williams & John M. Curtis, 2011. "New-New Trade Policy," Working Papers 1263, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
    14. Gunne Grankvist & Ulf Dahlstrand & Anders Biel, 2004. "The Impact of Environmental Labelling on Consumer Preference: Negative vs. Positive Labels," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 213-230, June.
    15. Hobbs, Jill E., 2010. "Public and Private Standards for Food Safety and Quality: International Trade Implications," eJADE: electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization, Agricultural and Development Economics Division, vol. 11(1).
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