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Non-dirty dancing? Interactions between eco-labels and consumers

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  • Teisl, Mario F.
  • Rubin, Jonathan
  • Noblet, Caroline L.

Abstract

Current studies on eco-labeling have been limited because they either examine the relationship between individual characteristics and eco-behavior or between label characteristics and eco-behavior. We extend this literature by designing and testing a model that explicitly links how the characteristics of the individual and the information simultaneously influence an information program's success. The specific application studies the potential effects of providing eco-information in the private market for passenger vehicles and light-duty trucks sold in the United States. The results point toward the importance of well-designed labeling practices as they significantly impact individuals' perceptions of the eco-friendliness of products. Further, the importance of underlying psychological factors; and individuals' priors of the product and of the environmental problem suggests a strong role for the long-run provision of eco-information, especially in cases where individuals hold incorrect perceptions.

Suggested Citation

  • Teisl, Mario F. & Rubin, Jonathan & Noblet, Caroline L., 2008. "Non-dirty dancing? Interactions between eco-labels and consumers," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 140-159, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:joepsy:v:29:y:2008:i:2:p:140-159
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