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Traceability Adoption at the Farm Level: An Empirical Analysis of the Portuguese Pear Industry

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  • Souza Monteiro, Diogo M.
  • Caswell, Julie A.

Abstract

Traceability is becoming a condition for doing business in European food markets. Retailers are adopting standards that are more stringent than what is mandatory. An example is EurepGAP, a quality standard for good agricultural practices that includes traceability as a main requirement. We analyze EurepGAP implementation in the Portuguese pear industry and find that implementation cannot be distinguished from sales to British supermarkets. Discrete choice models show the odds of traceability adoption increase with farm size and previous compliance with quality assurance schemes, while farm productivity has a negative impact on the probability of adoption.

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  • Souza Monteiro, Diogo M. & Caswell, Julie A., 2006. "Traceability Adoption at the Farm Level: An Empirical Analysis of the Portuguese Pear Industry," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21132, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea06:21132
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    Cited by:

    1. Aubert, M. & Bouhsina, Z. & Codron, J.M. & Rousset, S., 2013. "Pesticide safety risk, food chain organization, and the adoption of sustainable farming practices. The case of Moroccan early tomatoes," Working Papers MOISA 201304, UMR MOISA : Marchés, Organisations, Institutions et Stratégies d'Acteurs : CIHEAM-IAMM, CIRAD, INRA, Montpellier SupAgro - Montpellier, France.
    2. Codron, Jean-Marie & Adanacioğlu, Hakan & Aubert, Magali & Bouhsina, Zouhair & El Mekki, Abdelkader Ait & Rousset, Sylvain & Tozanli, Selma & Yercan, Murat, 2014. "The role of market forces and food safety institutions in the adoption of sustainable farming practices: The case of the fresh tomato export sector in Morocco and Turkey," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(P1), pages 268-280.
    3. Mulu Gebreeyesus, 2015. "Firm adoption of international standards: evidence from the Ethiopian floriculture sector," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 46(S1), pages 139-155, November.
    4. Banterle, Alessandro & Souza Monteiro, Diogo M. & Stranieri, Stefanella, 2009. "Does traceability play a role in retailer’s strategies for private labels?," 83rd Annual Conference, March 30-April 1, 2009, Dublin, Ireland 50933, Agricultural Economics Society.
    5. Bulut, Harun & Lawrence, John D., 2007. "Meat Slaughter and Processing Plants' Traceability Levels Evidence From Iowa," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12791, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Herzfeld, Thomas & Drescher, Larissa S. & Grebitus, Carola, 2011. "Cross-national adoption of private food quality standards," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 401-411.
    7. Brofman, Freddy & Garcia Martinez, Marian & Souza Monteiro, Diogo M., 2008. "Economic Evaluation of Food Traceability Systems through Reference Models," 110th Seminar, February 18-22, 2008, Innsbruck-Igls, Austria 49772, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Danielle Galliano & Luis Orozco, 2011. "The determinants of electronic traceability adoption: a firm‐level analysis of French agribusiness," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(3), pages 379-397, June.
    9. MiklósPakurár & Sándor Kovács & József Popp & András Vántus, 2015. "Innovative solutions in traceability to improve the competitiveness of a local fruit and vegetable retailing system," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 17(39), pages 676-676, May.
    10. Alessandro Banterle & Stefanella Stranieri, 2013. "Sustainability Standards and the Reorganization of Private Label Supply Chains: A Transaction Cost Perspective," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(12), pages 1-17, December.

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