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Traceability And Certification In Meat Supply Chains

Author

Listed:
  • Meuwissen, Miranda P.M.
  • Velthuis, Annet G.J.
  • Hogeveen, Henk
  • Huirne, Ruud B.M.

Abstract

Food safety problems such as the BSE and dioxin crises focused attention on traceability systems and the certification of such systems. This study analyzes the status and perspectives of traceability systems and certification schemes, and reviews their potential costs and benefits. Results indicate that traceability and certification in meat supply chains comprise a very dynamic area with an increasing impact. Necessary transparency, control of livestock epidemics, increasing due diligence, and a declining role for governments are critical factors. Findings also reveal there is a general focus on the technical characteristics of traceability and certification, and there is a lack of economic considerations. Therefore, specific topics are emphasized for an economic research agenda, such as an analysis of the break-even point for the level of detail of traceability systems, the reconsideration of liability and recall insurance schemes, and regulatory incentives to motivate adoption by free-riders.

Suggested Citation

  • Meuwissen, Miranda P.M. & Velthuis, Annet G.J. & Hogeveen, Henk & Huirne, Ruud B.M., 2003. "Traceability And Certification In Meat Supply Chains," Journal of Agribusiness, Agricultural Economics Association of Georgia, vol. 21(2), pages 1-15.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jloagb:14666
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.14666
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/14666/files/21020167.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Diogo M. Souza-Monteiro & Julie A. Caswell, 2010. "The Economics of Voluntary Traceability in Multi-Ingredient Food Chains," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(1), pages 122-142.
    2. A.G.J. Velthuis & M. Meuwissen & R.B.M. Huirne, 2009. "Distribution of direct recall costs along the milk chain," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(4), pages 466-479.
    3. Asioli, Daniele & Boecker, Andreas & Canavari, Maurizio, 2012. "Perceived Traceability Costs and Benefits in the Italian Fisheries Supply Chain," International Journal on Food System Dynamics, International Center for Management, Communication, and Research, vol. 2(4), pages 1-19, March.
    4. Tuba Pekkirbizli & Mohamad Isam Almadani & Ludwig Theuvsen, 2015. "Food safety and quality assurance systems in Turkish agribusiness: an empirical analysis of determinants of adoption," ECONOMIA AGRO-ALIMENTARE, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 17(3), pages 31-55.
    5. Henson, Spencer J. & Sparling, David & Herath, Deepananda P.B. & Dessureault, Simon, 2005. "Traceability in the Canadian Dairy Processing Sector," Economic and Market Information 55303, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada.
    6. Sonntag, Winnie & Theuvsen, Ludwig & Kersting, Valerie & Otter, Verena, 2016. "Have Industrialized Countries Shut the Door and Left the Key Inside? Rethinking the Role of Private Standards in the International Fruit Trade," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association, vol. 19(2), pages 1-20, May.
    7. Souza Monteiro, Diogo M. & Caswell, Julie A., 2005. "The Economics of Traceability for Multi-Ingredient Products: A Network Approach," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19143, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    8. Azmawani Abd Rahman & Mohani Abdul, 2017. "Establishment of Traceability practices through Halal Assurance System (HAS) Implementation," International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, vol. 7(6), pages 130-139, June.
    9. Souza Monteiro, Diogo M. & Caswell, Julie A., 2009. "Traceability adoption at the farm level: An empirical analysis of the Portuguese pear industry," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 94-101, February.
    10. Adina-Roxana MUNTEANU, 2015. "The Third Party Certification System For Organic Products," Network Intelligence Studies, Romanian Foundation for Business Intelligence, Editorial Department, issue 6, pages 145-151, December.
    11. Danielle Galliano & Luis Orozco, 2011. "The determinants of electronic traceability adoption: a firm‐level analysis of French agribusiness," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(3), pages 379-397, June.
    12. Padilla Bravo, Carlos Antonio & Spiller, Achim & Villalobos, Pablo, 2012. "Are Organic Growers Satisfied with the Certification System? A Causal Analysis of Farmers’ Perceptions in Chile," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association, vol. 15(4), pages 1-22, November.
    13. Theuvsen, Ludwig, 2008. "Lebensmittelkennzeichnungen: in ihrer Wirkung überschätzt," German Journal of Agricultural Economics, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department for Agricultural Economics, vol. 57(05), pages 1-2.
    14. Tarun Kumar Agrawal & Rudrajeet Pal, 2019. "Traceability in Textile and Clothing Supply Chains: Classifying Implementation Factors and Information Sets via Delphi Study," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(6), pages 1-18, March.
    15. Shahbaz Khan & Abid Haleem & Mohd Imran Khan & Mustufa Haider Abidi & Abdulrahman Al-Ahmari, 2018. "Implementing Traceability Systems in Specific Supply Chain Management (SCM) through Critical Success Factors (CSFs)," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(1), pages 1-26, January.
    16. Friederike Albersmeier & Holger Schulze & Achim Spiller, 2009. "Evaluation and reliability of the organic certification system: perceptions by farmers in Latin America," Sustainable Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(5), pages 311-324.
    17. Liang, Q. & Zhou, J. & Jin, C. & Zhou, W. & Wang, Y., 2018. "Trends, transferring, and sources of aquatic products Risks in China: Evidence from the sampling inspections by national and provincial CFDA," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277056, International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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