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Traceability And Information Technology In The Meat Supply Chain: Implications For Firm Organization And Market Structure

  • Buhr, Brian L.

The traditional food supply chain is arranged as a complex array of producers, handlers, processors, manufacturers, distributors, and retailers. As the food supply chain grew in complexity over time, little emphasis was placed on preserving information regarding the origin of raw materials and their transformation, often by multiple handlers, into consumer-ready products. This paper provides case illustrations of the implementation of information systems for support of traceability in Europe. Observations on these firms coupled with the literature on information asymmetry and transactions costs is used to provide insights into how traceability implementation might affect U.S. meat-industry structure.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/27057
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Article provided by Food Distribution Research Society in its journal Journal of Food Distribution Research.

Volume (Year): 34 (2003)
Issue (Month): 03 (November)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:jlofdr:27057
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://fdrs.ag.utk.edu/

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  1. Sunding, David & Zilberman, David, 2001. "The agricultural innovation process: Research and technology adoption in a changing agricultural sector," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 4, pages 207-261 Elsevier.
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  3. Dickinson, David L. & Bailey, DeeVon, 2002. "Meat Traceability: Are U.S. Consumers Willing To Pay For It?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 27(02), December.
  4. Hooker, Neal H. & Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr. & Siebert, John W., 1999. "Assessing The Economics Of Food Safety Activities: Studies Of Beef Slaughter And Meat Processing," Faculty Paper Series 24003, Texas A&M University, Department of Agricultural Economics.
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  6. Leland, Hayne E, 1979. "Quacks, Lemons, and Licensing: A Theory of Minimum Quality Standards," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 87(6), pages 1328-46, December.
  7. Hurt, Christopher, 1994. "Industrialization in the Pork Industry," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 9(4).
  8. Jensen, Michael C. & Meckling, William H., 1976. "Theory of the firm: Managerial behavior, agency costs and ownership structure," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 305-360, October.
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