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Voluntary Traceability and Transaction Costs: An Empirical Analysis in the Italian Meat Processing Supply Chain

Author

Listed:
  • Banterle, Alessandro
  • Stranieri, Stefanella
  • Baldi, Lucia

Abstract

This paper analyses voluntary traceability effects on the coordination of the food supply chain from the transaction cost perspective. The analysis concerns Italian firms and makes particular reference to the meat sector. A survey was conducted by questionnaire to assess the changes in key transaction factors and costs after the introduction of traceability. The results underline an increase in the degree of human, material and site asset specificity, and reveal a reduction in the degree of uncertainty in transactions. Growth in some transaction costs related to monitoring is also observed. Factorial and cluster analysis were used to underline the different organisational solutions of the firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Banterle, Alessandro & Stranieri, Stefanella & Baldi, Lucia, 2006. "Voluntary Traceability and Transaction Costs: An Empirical Analysis in the Italian Meat Processing Supply Chain," 99th Seminar, February 8-10, 2006, Bonn, Germany 7722, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae99:7722
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/7722
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Williamson, Oliver E, 1979. "Transaction-Cost Economics: The Governance of Contractural Relations," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(2), pages 233-261, October.
    2. A. Meltzer & Peter Ordeshook & Thomas Romer, 1983. "Introduction," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 1-5, January.
    3. George A. Akerlof, 1970. "The Market for "Lemons": Quality Uncertainty and the Market Mechanism," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(3), pages 488-500.
    4. Jill E. Hobbs, 2004. "Information asymmetry and the role of traceability systems," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(4), pages 397-415.
    5. A. P. Thirlwall, 1983. "Introduction," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(3), pages 341-344, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Stranieri, Stefanella & Banterle, Alessandro, 2006. "Firms' strategies and voluntary traceability: an empirical analysis in Italian food chains," 98th Seminar, June 29-July 2, 2006, Chania, Crete, Greece 10091, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Souza Monteiro, Diogo M. & Caswell, Julie A., 2009. "Traceability adoption at the farm level: An empirical analysis of the Portuguese pear industry," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 94-101, February.
    3. Alessandro Banterle & Stefanella Stranieri, 2008. "Information, labelling, and vertical coordination: an analysis of the Italian meat supply networks," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(3), pages 320-331.
    4. Banterle, Alessandro & Stranieri, Stefanella, 2008. "The consequences of voluntary traceability system for supply chain relationships. An application of transaction cost economics," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 560-569, December.

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