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M. Najeeb Shafiq

Personal Details

First Name:M. Najeeb
Middle Name:
Last Name:Shafiq
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psh248
http://www.pitt.edu/~mnshafiq
Department of Administrative and Policy Studies, 230 S. Bouquet Street, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15260
1.412.648.1832

Affiliation

(50%) Graduate School of Public and International Affairs (GSPIA)
University of Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)
http://www.gspia.pitt.edu/

412-648-7640

3601 Posvar Hall, 230 S. Bouquet Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260
RePEc:edi:sppitus (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Department of Economics
University of Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)
http://www.econ.pitt.edu/

(412)648-1760
(412)648-1793
4S01 W.W. Posvar hall, 230 Bouquet St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260
RePEc:edi:depghus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Fasih,Tazeen & Patrinos,Harry Anthony & Shafiq,M. Najeeb, 2020. "Economic Crises and Returns to University Education in Middle-Income Countries : Stylized Facts and COVID-19 Projections," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9472, The World Bank.
  2. Patrinos, Harry Anthony & Shafiq, M. Najeeb, 2008. "A positive stigma for child labor ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4697, The World Bank.

Articles

  1. Sun, Lunxuan & Shafiq, M. Najeeb & McClure, Maureen & Guo, Sisi, 2020. "Are there educational and psychological benefits from private supplementary tutoring in Mainland China? Evidence from the China Education Panel Survey, 2013–15," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C).
  2. M. Najeeb Shafiq & Robert K. Toutkoushian & Alexandria Valerio, 2019. "Who Benefits from Higher Education in Low- and Middle-Income Countries?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 55(11), pages 2403-2423, November.
  3. Shafiq, M. Najeeb, 2015. "Aspects of Moral Change in India, 1990–2006: Evidence from Public Attitudes toward Tax Evasion and Bribery," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 136-148.
  4. M. Najeeb Shafiq, 2013. "Gender gaps in mathematics, science and reading achievements in Muslim countries: a quantile regression approach," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(4), pages 343-359, September.
  5. Shafiq M. Najeeb, 2011. "Do School Incentives and Accountability Measures Improve Skills in the Middle East and North Africa? The Cases of Jordan and Tunisia," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-28, September.
  6. M. Najeeb Shafiq, 2011. "What Criteria Should Policy-makers Use for Assisting Households with Educational Expenditure?," South Asia Economic Journal, Institute of Policy Studies of Sri Lanka, vol. 12(1), pages 25-37, March.
  7. M. Najeeb Shafiq & Abdulkader H. Sinno, 2010. "Education, Income, and Support for Suicide Bombings: Evidence from Six Muslim Countries," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 54(1), pages 146-178, February.
  8. Harry A Patrinos & Najeeb Shafiq, 2010. "An Empirical Illustration of Positive Stigma towards Child Labor," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(1), pages 799-807.
  9. M. Najeeb Shafiq & Karen Ross, 2010. "Educational Attainment and Attitudes Towards War in Muslim Countries Contemplating War: The Cases of Jordan, Lebanon, Pakistan, and Turkey," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(8), pages 1424-1441.
  10. Shafiq, M. Najeeb, 2010. "Do education and income affect support for democracy in Muslim countries? Evidence from the Pew Global Attitudes Project," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 461-469, June.
  11. M. Najeeb Shafiq, 2009. "A reversal of educational fortune? Educational gender gaps in Bangladesh," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(1), pages 137-155.
  12. M. Najeeb Shafiq, 2007. "Household Rates of Return to Education in Rural Bangladesh: Accounting for Direct Costs, Child Labour, and Option Value," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 343-358.
  13. Shafiq, M. Najeeb, 2007. "Household schooling and child labor decisions in rural Bangladesh," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 946-966, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Shafiq, M. Najeeb, 2010. "Do education and income affect support for democracy in Muslim countries? Evidence from the Pew Global Attitudes Project," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 461-469, June.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Le défi de l’accès et de la qualité de l’éducation dans les pays en développement
      by marine.talance@gmail.com (Marine de Talance) in BS Initiative on 2015-02-05 15:54:26

Working papers

  1. Patrinos, Harry Anthony & Shafiq, M. Najeeb, 2008. "A positive stigma for child labor ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4697, The World Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Vimefall, Elin, 2011. "What determines which children work? Empirical evidence from Kenya," Working Papers 2011:3, Örebro University, School of Business.

Articles

  1. Shafiq M. Najeeb, 2011. "Do School Incentives and Accountability Measures Improve Skills in the Middle East and North Africa? The Cases of Jordan and Tunisia," Review of Middle East Economics and Finance, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-28, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Josep-Oriol Escardíbul & Nehal Helmy, 2014. "School Autonomy Impact on the Quality of Education: The case of Tunisia and Jordan," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 9, in: Adela García Aracil & Isabel Neira Gómez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 9, edition 1, volume 9, chapter 26, pages 501-514, Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    2. Josep-Oriol Escardíbul & Nehal Helmy, 2015. "Decentralisation and school autonomy impact on the quality of education: the case of two MENA countries," Working Papers 2015/33, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    3. Bouhlila, Donia Smaali, 2015. "The Heyneman–Loxley effect revisited in the Middle East and North Africa: Analysis using TIMSS 2007 database," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 85-95.

  2. M. Najeeb Shafiq & Abdulkader H. Sinno, 2010. "Education, Income, and Support for Suicide Bombings: Evidence from Six Muslim Countries," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 54(1), pages 146-178, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Brockhoff & Tim Krieger & Daniel Meierrieks, 2012. "Great Expectations and Hard Times - The (Nontrivial) Impact of Education on Domestic Terrorism," CESifo Working Paper Series 3817, CESifo.
    2. Shafiq, M. Najeeb, 2015. "Aspects of Moral Change in India, 1990–2006: Evidence from Public Attitudes toward Tax Evasion and Bribery," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 136-148.
    3. Nobuhiro Mizuno & Ryosuke Okazawa, 2017. "Within-group heterogeneity and civil war," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 18(2), pages 153-177, May.
    4. Kirill Zhirkov & Maykel Verkuyten & Jeroen Weesie, 2013. "World Politics and Support for Terrorism within Muslim Populations: Evidence from Muslim Countries and Western Europe," HSE Working papers WP BRP 08/SOC/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    5. Ismail, Aisha & Amjad, Shehla, 2014. "Determinants of terrorism in Pakistan: An empirical investigation," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 320-331.
    6. Asadullah, Niaz, 2018. "Madrasah for Girls and Private School for Boys? The Determinants of School Type Choice in Rural and Urban Indonesia," IZA Discussion Papers 11362, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Friedrich Schneider & Tilman Brück & Daniel Meierrieks, 2015. "The Economics Of Counterterrorism: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(1), pages 131-157, February.
    8. Tausch, Arno, 2016. "Occidentalism, terrorism, and the Shari’a state: new multivariate perspectives on Islamism based on international survey data," MPRA Paper 69498, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Malečková Jitka & Stanišić Dragana, 2013. "Does Higher Education Decrease Support for Terrorism?," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 19(3), pages 343-358, December.
    10. Sarah Brockhoff & Tim Krieger & Daniel Meierrieks, 2010. "Ties That Do Not Bind (Directly): The Education-Terrorism Nexus Revisited," Working Papers CIE 26, Paderborn University, CIE Center for International Economics.
    11. James A. Piazza, 2019. "Democratic skepticism and support for terrorism in the Palestinian Territories," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 178(3), pages 417-443, March.

  3. Harry A Patrinos & Najeeb Shafiq, 2010. "An Empirical Illustration of Positive Stigma towards Child Labor," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(1), pages 799-807.

    Cited by:

    1. Basu, Arnab K. & Dimova, Ralitza, 2020. "Household Behavioral Preferences and the Child Labor-Education Trade-off: Framed Field Experimental Evidence from Ethiopia," IZA Discussion Papers 13011, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Heather Congdon Fors, 2012. "Child Labour: A Review Of Recent Theory And Evidence With Policy Implications," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(4), pages 570-593, September.
    3. Krauss, Alexander, 2017. "Understanding child labour beyond the standard economic assumption of monetary poverty," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 68497, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Congdon Fors, Heather, 2012. "Social Globalization and Child Labor," Working Papers in Economics 533, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    5. Heather Congdon Fors, 2014. "Social Globalization and Child Labor: A Cross-country Analysis," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 52(2), pages 125-153, June.
    6. Basu, Arnab K. & Dimova, Ralitza, 2021. "Household Preferences and Child Labor in Rural Ethiopia," IZA Discussion Papers 14062, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  4. Shafiq, M. Najeeb, 2010. "Do education and income affect support for democracy in Muslim countries? Evidence from the Pew Global Attitudes Project," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 461-469, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Viktoria Spaiser & Shyam Ranganathan & Richard P Mann & David J T Sumpter, 2014. "The Dynamics of Democracy, Development and Cultural Values," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 9(6), pages 1-11, June.
    2. Cecilia García-Peñalosa & Maty Konte, 2013. "Why Are Women Less Democratic Than Men? Evidence from Sub-Saharan African Countries," AMSE Working Papers 1319, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France.
    3. Suwastika Naidu, 2016. "Does Human Development Influence Women’s Labour Force Participation Rate? Evidences from the Fiji Islands," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(3), pages 1067-1084, July.
    4. Robbert Maseland & André Hoorn, 2011. "Why Muslims like democracy yet have so little of it," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 147(3), pages 481-496, June.
    5. M. Joseph Sirgy & Mohsen Joshanloo & Richard J. Estes, 2019. "The Global Challenge of Jihadist Terrorism: A Quality-of-Life Model," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 141(1), pages 191-215, January.
    6. Maty Konte & Stephan Klasen, 2016. "Gender difference in support for Democracy in Sub-Saharan Africa: Do social institutions matter?," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(2), pages 55-86, April.
    7. M. Joseph Sirgy & Richard J. Estes & Don R. Rahtz, 2018. "Combatting Jihadist Terrorism: A Quality-of-Life Perspective," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 13(4), pages 813-837, December.

  5. M. Najeeb Shafiq, 2009. "A reversal of educational fortune? Educational gender gaps in Bangladesh," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(1), pages 137-155.

    Cited by:

    1. Siahaan, Freddy & Lee, Daniel Y. & Kalist, David E., 2014. "Educational attainment of children of immigrants: Evidence from the national longitudinal survey of youth," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 1-8.
    2. Kenayathulla, Husaina Banu, 2016. "Gender differences in intra-household educational expenditures in Malaysia," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 59-73.
    3. Blunch, Niels-Hugo & Das, Maitreyi Bordia, 2007. "Changing norms about gender inequality in education : evidence from Bangladesh," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4404, The World Bank.
    4. Acar, Elif Öznur & Günalp, Burak & Cilasun, Seyit Mümin, 2016. "An empirical analysis of household education expenditures in Turkey," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 23-35.

  6. M. Najeeb Shafiq, 2007. "Household Rates of Return to Education in Rural Bangladesh: Accounting for Direct Costs, Child Labour, and Option Value," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 343-358.

    Cited by:

    1. Eric V. Edmonds, 2007. "Child Labor," NBER Working Papers 12926, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Stephen Bazen & Claire Salmon, 2010. "The impact of parental health on child labor: the case of Bangladesh," Post-Print hal-00962336, HAL.
    3. Mohammad Nashir Uddin & Mohammad Hamiduzzaman & Bernhard G. Gunter, 2009. "Physical and Psychological Implications of Risky Child Labor: A Study in Sylhet City, Bangladesh," Bangladesh Development Research Working Paper Series (BDRWPS) BDRWPS No. 8, Bangladesh Development Research Center (BDRC).

  7. Shafiq, M. Najeeb, 2007. "Household schooling and child labor decisions in rural Bangladesh," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 946-966, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Eric V. Edmonds, 2007. "Child Labor," NBER Working Papers 12926, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Mardochée Ngandu Mulotwa & Christian Mabi & Isaac Kalonda & Séraphin Mvudi, 2018. "Labor Demand and Farm Household Welfare Under Non-separability in South Kivu (DRC) [Demande du travail agricole et bien-être des ménages agricoles sous non-séparabilité au Sud-Kivu (RD Congo)]," Working Papers hal-01845493, HAL.
    3. Moussa Keita, 2014. "Pauvreté et arbitrage entre scolarisation et travail des enfants au Mali," Working Papers halshs-01064821, HAL.
    4. Miwa Kana & Han Phoumin & Fukui Seiichi, 2010. "Does Child Labour Have a Negative Impact on Child Education and Health? A Case Study in Rural Cambodia," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(3), pages 357-382.
    5. S. Chandrasekhar & Sajeda Amin, 2010. "Looking Beyond Universal Primary Education: Gender Differences in Time Use among Children in Rural Bangladesh," Working Papers id:2837, eSocialSciences.
    6. Kasat, Puja, 2010. "Innovative Approaches to Developmental Microfinance in India," MPRA Paper 22238, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Krauss, Alexander, 2017. "Understanding child labour beyond the standard economic assumption of monetary poverty," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 68497, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Lulit Mitik & Bernard Decaluwé, 2009. "Market Labor, Household Work and Schooling in South Africa: Modeling the Effects of Trade on Adults' and Children's Time Allocation," Cahiers de recherche 0933, CIRPEE.
    9. Gong, Xin & Zhang, Hui & Yao, Haogen, 2015. "The determinants of compulsory education performance of migrant children in Beijing: An analysis of two cohorts," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 1-15.
    10. Jean-Pierre Lachaud, 2007. "Scolarisation et travail des enfants : Un modèle économétrique à régimes endogènes appliqué à Madagascar - 2001-2005," Documents de travail 134, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
    11. Mohammad Nashir Uddin & Mohammad Hamiduzzaman & Bernhard G. Gunter, 2009. "Physical and Psychological Implications of Risky Child Labor: A Study in Sylhet City, Bangladesh," Bangladesh Development Research Working Paper Series (BDRWPS) BDRWPS No. 8, Bangladesh Development Research Center (BDRC).
    12. Salma Ahmad & Ranjan Ray, 2014. "Health consequences of child labour in Bangladesh," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(4), pages 111-150.
    13. Aeggarchat Sirisankanan, 2017. "Household Risks and Household Human Capital Investment: Longitudinal Evidence from Thailand," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 29(2), pages 493-511, April.
    14. Webbink, Ellen & Smits, Jeroen & de Jong, Eelke, 2012. "Hidden Child Labor: Determinants of Housework and Family Business Work of Children in 16 Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 631-642.
    15. Nengroo, Aasif Hussain & Bhat, Gulam Mohammad, 2017. "Why child labour? Evidences from homebased carpet weaving industry of Kashmir," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 50-56.
    16. Kechagia, Polyxeni & Metaxas, Theodore, 2020. "FDI, child labor and gender issues in Sub – Saharan Africa: an empirical approach," MPRA Paper 104311, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    17. Diaz-Serrano, Luis, 2020. "The Duration of Compulsory Education and the Transition to Secondary Education: Panel Data Evidence from Low-Income Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 13918, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    18. Diaz-Serrano, Luis, 2020. "The duration of compulsory education and the transition to secondary education: Panel data evidence from low-income countries," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 75(C).
    19. Nakajima, Maki & Kijima, Yoko & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2018. "Is the learning crisis responsible for school dropout? A longitudinal study of Andhra Pradesh, India," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 245-253.
    20. Díaz Serrano, Lluís, 2020. "The Duration of Compulsory Education and the Transition to Secondary Education: Panel Data Evidence from Low-Income Countries," Working Papers 2072/376037, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

Featured entries

This author is featured on the following reading lists, publication compilations, Wikipedia, or ReplicationWiki entries:
  1. Islamic Ecomonics
  2. Bangladesh related Economists

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2008-09-13
  2. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2008-09-13

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