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The impact of parental health on child labor: the case of Bangladesh

Author

Listed:
  • Stephen Bazen

    () (GREQAM, Université d'Aix-Marseille II, France)

  • Claire Salmon

    () (IREGE, Universite de Savoie)

Abstract

In recent years, there has been a marked increase in the number of studies that examine the economics of child labor and more particularly the determinants of children's labor supply in developing countries. This paper provides a new angle on the causes of child labor force participation by showing that parents' health affects child labor through family labor supply decisions. Using a survey with detailed information on health matters for Bangladesh, we find that child labor supply is sometimes takes the form of an added worker effect in reaction to certain types of health shock.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephen Bazen & Claire Salmon, 2010. "The impact of parental health on child labor: the case of Bangladesh," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(4), pages 2549-2557.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-10-00114
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Basu, Kaushik & Van, Pham Hoang, 1998. "The Economics of Child Labor," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 412-427, June.
    2. Sonia Bhalotra, 2007. "Is Child Work Necessary?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 69(1), pages 29-55, February.
    3. Shahina Amin & M. Shakil Quayes & Janet M. Rives, 2004. "Poverty and Other Determinants of Child Labor in Bangladesh," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 70(4), pages 876-892, April.
    4. Ravallion, Martin & Wodon, Quentin, 2000. "Does Child Labour Displace Schooling? Evidence on Behavioural Responses to an Enrollment Subsidy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 158-175, March.
    5. M. Najeeb Shafiq, 2007. "Household Rates of Return to Education in Rural Bangladesh: Accounting for Direct Costs, Child Labour, and Option Value," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 343-358.
    6. Beegle, Kathleen & Dehejia, Rajeev H. & Gatti, Roberta, 2006. "Child labor and agricultural shocks," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 80-96, October.
    7. E. delap, 2001. "Economic and Cultural Forces in the Child Labour Debate: Evidence from Urban Bangladesh," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(4), pages 1-22.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alam, Shamma Adeeb, 2015. "Parental health shocks, child labor and educational outcomes: Evidence from Tanzania," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 161-175.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child labor; health shocks; family labor supply decisions; Banglasdesh;

    JEL classification:

    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior

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