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Parental health shocks, child labor and educational outcomes: Evidence from Tanzania

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  • Alam, Shamma Adeeb

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of parental illness on children's education. We find that only father's illness decreases children's school attendance. Father's illness also has long-term impacts on child education, as it decreases children's likelihood of completing primary school and leads to fewer years of schooling. However, we find no evidence that father's illness affects schooling through increased child labor. Instead, father's illness decreases household's income and reduces school attendance possibly because of the reduced ability of the family to afford education. In contrast, mother's illness and illness of other household members have no effect on children's schooling.

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  • Alam, Shamma Adeeb, 2015. "Parental health shocks, child labor and educational outcomes: Evidence from Tanzania," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 161-175.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:44:y:2015:i:c:p:161-175
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2015.09.004
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    Cited by:

    1. Esteban García-Miralles & Miriam Gensowski, 2020. "Are Children's Socio-Emotional Skills Shaped by Parental Health Shocks?," CEBI working paper series 20-21, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. The Center for Economic Behavior and Inequality (CEBI).
    2. Huong Thu Le & Ha Trong Nguyen, 2015. "Intergenerational Transmission in Health: Causal estimates from fixed effects instrumental variables models for two cohorts of Australian children," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1509, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    3. Ogasawara, Kota, 2018. "Health and education during industrialization: Evidence from early twentieth century Japan," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 40-54.
    4. Cristian Bortes & Mattias Strandh & Karina Nilsson, 0. "Parental Illness and Young People’s Education," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 0, pages 1-23.
    5. Kasper Brandt & Longinus Rutasitara & Onesmo Selejio & Neda Trifkovic, 2017. "Entrepreneurship and human capital development in children," WIDER Working Paper Series 198, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Yonatan Dinku & David Fielding & Murat Genç, 2018. "Health shocks and child time allocation decisions by households: evidence from Ethiopia," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 7(1), pages 1-23, December.
    7. Thomas Ferreira, 2018. "Does education enhance productivity in smallholder agriculture? Causal evidence from Malawi," Working Papers 05/2018, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    8. Virginie Comblon & Karine Marazyan, 2017. "Labor Supply Responses to Chronic Illness in Senegal," Working Papers 20170006, UMR Développement et Sociétés, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement.
    9. Abdulmumini Baba Alfa & Abdulmumini Baba Alfa & Mohammed Zaini Abd Karim, 2016. "Effect of Child Labor and Performance on Child Relationship with Head in Rural Areas of Niger State, Nigeria," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(3), pages 892-900.
    10. Lutfullah Lutf & Shahadat I Haq Yasini, 2018. "Factors Contributing to Child Labor in Afghanistan: A Case Study in Jalalabad City," Economic Alternatives, University of National and World Economy, Sofia, Bulgaria, issue 3, pages 348-372, September.
    11. Huong Thu Le & Ha Trong Nguyen, 2017. "Parental health and children's cognitive and noncognitive development: New evidence from the longitudinal survey of Australian children," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(12), pages 1767-1788, December.
    12. Kasper Brandt & Longinus Rutasitara & Onesmo Selejio & Neda Trifkovi?, 2017. "Entrepreneurship and human capital development in children," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2017-198, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    13. Mendolia, Silvia & Nguyen, Thi & Yerokhin, Oleg, 2017. "The Impact of Parental Health on Children's Schooling and Labour Force Participation: Evidence from Vietnam," IZA Discussion Papers 10651, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    14. Woode, Maame Esi, 2017. "Parental health shocks and schooling: The impact of mutual health insurance in Rwanda," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 173(C), pages 35-47.
    15. Cristian Bortes & Mattias Strandh & Karina Nilsson, 2020. "Parental Illness and Young People’s Education," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 13(6), pages 2069-2091, December.
    16. Lim, Sung Soo, 2020. "Parental chronic illness and child education: Evidence from children in Indonesia," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 73(C).
    17. Silvia Mendolia & Nga Nguyen & Oleg Yerokhin, 2019. "The impact of parental illness on children’s schooling and labour force participation: evidence from Vietnam," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 469-492, June.
    18. Susmita Baulia, 2018. "Is household shock a boon or bane to the utilisation of preventive healthcare for children? Evidence from Uganda," Discussion Papers 121, Aboa Centre for Economics.
    19. Luca, Dara Lee & Bloom, David E., 2018. "The Returns to Parental Health: Evidence from Indonesia," IZA Discussion Papers 11987, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    20. Dara Lee Luca & David E. Bloom, 2018. "The Returns to Parental Health: Evidence from Indonesia," NBER Working Papers 25304, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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