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Health Shocks and Child Time Allocation Decisions by Households: Evidence from Ethiopia

Author

Listed:
  • Yonatan Dinku

    () (Department of Economics, University of Otago, New Zealand)

  • David Fielding

    () (Department of Economics, University of Otago, New Zealand)

  • Murat Genc

    () (Department of Economics, University of Otago, New Zealand)

Abstract

Little is currently known about the effects of shocks to parental health on the allocation of children’s time between alternative activities. Using longitudinal data from the Ethiopian Young Lives surveys of 2006 and 2009, we analyze the effect of health shocks on the amount of children’s time spent in work, leisure and education. We find that paternal illness increases the time spent in income-generating work but maternal illness increases the time spent in domestic work. Moreover, maternal illness has a relatively large effect on daughters while paternal illness has a relatively large effect on sons. Overall, parental illness leads to large and significant increases in the amount of child labour as defined by UNICEF.

Suggested Citation

  • Yonatan Dinku & David Fielding & Murat Genc, 2017. "Health Shocks and Child Time Allocation Decisions by Households: Evidence from Ethiopia," Working Papers 1705, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2017.
  • Handle: RePEc:otg:wpaper:1705
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    parental illness; child labour; Ethiopia;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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