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Is schooling forever doomed with child labor around? An analysis using Philippine time use data

Author

Listed:
  • Connie Bayudan-Dacuycuy

    (Ateneo de Manila University)

  • Lawrence Dacuycuy

    (De La Salle University)

Abstract

Using a rich survey data collected in the southern part of the Philippines, this paper aims to study the effect of child labor on the child's schooling outcomes. Results indicate that the efficient allocation of time can offset the impact of an increase in the child's work hours. If child labor cannot be prevented, the paper offers some directions on the type of public goods the government can provide.

Suggested Citation

  • Connie Bayudan-Dacuycuy & Lawrence Dacuycuy, 2013. "Is schooling forever doomed with child labor around? An analysis using Philippine time use data," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(1), pages 138-151.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-12-00865
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    child labor; schooling; Philippines; time use;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General

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