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Links and Architecture in Village Networks

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  • Pramila Krishnan
  • Emanuela Sciubba

Abstract

In this article we test the implications of a model of network formation on data from rural Ethiopia. In contrast to the current literature, we demonstrate the critical role of both number of links and architecture in determining the impact of social networks on outcomes. Social capital matters, but its impact differs by the architecture of the network to which one belongs. Copyright © The Author(s). Journal compilation © Royal Economic Society 2009.

Suggested Citation

  • Pramila Krishnan & Emanuela Sciubba, 2009. "Links and Architecture in Village Networks," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(537), pages 917-949, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:119:y:2009:i:537:p:917-949
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    Cited by:

    1. Marcel Fafchamps & Alexander Moradi, 2015. "Referral and Job Performance: Evidence from the Ghana Colonial Army," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 63(4), pages 715-751.
    2. Feinberg, Yossi & Kets, Willemien, 2014. "Ranking friends," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, pages 1-9.
    3. Abay, Kibrom A. & Kahsay, Goytom A. & Berhane, Guush, 2014. "Social networks and factor markets: Panel data evidence from Ethiopia:," ESSP working papers 68, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Bet Caeyers & Stefan Dercon, 2012. "Political Connections and Social Networks in Targeted Transfer Programs: Evidence from Rural Ethiopia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 60(4), pages 639-675.
    5. Hayley H. Chouinard & Gregmar I. Galinato & Philip R. Wandschneider, 2016. "Making Friends To Influence Others: Entry And Contribution Decisions That Affect Social Capital In An Association," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(2), pages 819-834, April.
    6. Jaromir Kovarik & Marco J. van der Leij, 2011. "Risk Aversion and Social Networks," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-072/1, Tinbergen Institute.
    7. Jaimovich, Dany, 2015. "Missing Links, Missing Markets: Evidence of the Transformation Process in the Economic Networks of Gambian Villages," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 645-664.
    8. Barr, Abigail & Dekker, Marleen & Fafchamps, Marcel, 2015. "The Formation of Community-Based Organizations: An Analysis of a Quasi-Experiment in Zimbabwe," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 131-153.
    9. Yonatan Dinku & David Fielding & Murat Genc, 2017. "Health Shocks and Child Time Allocation Decisions by Households: Evidence from Ethiopia," Working Papers 1705, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2017.
    10. Gilles Grandjean, 2014. "Risk-sharing networks and farsighted stability," Review of Economic Design, Springer;Society for Economic Design, vol. 18(3), pages 191-218, September.
    11. repec:eee:wdevel:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:122-140 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Jaimovich, Dany, 2013. "Missing links, missing markets: Internal exchanges, reciprocity and external connections in the economic networks of Gambian villages," MPRA Paper 44080, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Schmidt, Emily & Bekele, Firew, 2016. "Rural youth and employment in Ethiopia," ESSP working papers 98, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    14. Margherita Comola & Mariapia Mendola, 2013. "The Formation of Migrant Networks," Development Working Papers 353, Centro Studi Luca d'Agliano, University of Milano.
    15. Matuschke, Ira, 2008. "Evaluating the impact of social networks in rural innovation systems: An overview," IFPRI discussion papers 816, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    16. repec:eee:wdevel:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:1-14 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. de Brauw, Alan & Mueller, Valerie & Lee, Hak Lim, 2014. "The Role of Rural–Urban Migration in the Structural Transformation of Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 33-42.
    18. A. Stefano Caria & Marcel Fafchamps, 2015. "Can Farmers Create Efficient Information Networks? Experimental Evidence from Rural India," CSAE Working Paper Series 2015-07, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    19. Chen, Xi, 2014. "Gift-giving and Network Structure in Rural China: Utilizing Long-term Spontaneous Gift Records," IZA Discussion Papers 8642, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    20. Yann Bramoullé & Bernard Fortin, 2009. "The Econometrics of Social Networks," Cahiers de recherche 0913, CIRPEE.
    21. Herings, P.J.J. & Mauleon, A. & Vannetelbosch, V., 2014. "Stability of networks under level-k farsightedness," Research Memorandum 030, Maastricht University, Graduate School of Business and Economics (GSBE).
    22. Debebe, Z.Y., 2010. "Child labor, agricultural shocks and labor sharing in rural Ethiopia," ISS Working Papers - General Series 18702, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements

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