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Social Learning and Parameter Uncertainty in Irreversible Investment----Evidence from Greenhouse Adoption in Northern China

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  • Wang, Honglin
  • Reardon, Thomas

Abstract

This paper introduces social learning into irreversible investment theory through parameter uncertainty, and shows that social learning could reduce parameter uncertainty to facilitate irreversible investment technology adoption. The theoretic model is tested by using household level data from energy saving greenhouse adoption in northern China, and empirical evidences are consistent with the theory: social learning has significantly positive impacts on greenhouse adoption, while market volatility discourages the adoption.

Suggested Citation

  • Wang, Honglin & Reardon, Thomas, 2008. "Social Learning and Parameter Uncertainty in Irreversible Investment----Evidence from Greenhouse Adoption in Northern China," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6310, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea08:6310
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Elisabeth SADOULET, 2016. "Review of Theories of Learning for Adopting," Working Papers P163, FERDI.
    2. Hoken, Hisatoshi & Su, Qun, 2015. "Measuring the effect of agricultural cooperatives on household income using PSM-DID : a case study of a rice-producing cooperative in China," IDE Discussion Papers 539, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social Learning; Technology Adoption; Irreversible Investment; Parameter Uncertainty; Energy Saving Greenhouse; Environmental Economics and Policy; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; O12; O31; C61; D83; G12;

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services

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