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Credit constraints as a barrier to technology adoption by the poor : lessons from South Indian small-scale fishery

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  • Gine, Xavier
  • Klonner, Stefan

Abstract

It is generally recognized that the adoption of a new technology plays a fundamental role in the development process. However, the benefits from the introduction of the technology may be unevenly distributed among the population, especially if the markets do not function properly. While the microeconomic literature on technology adopted and diffusion focuses on"who"and"when,"the macroeconomic literature has focused on the overall impact of globalization on inequality. In this paper the authors bring these two strands of the literature together by studying the diffusion of plastic reinforced fiber boats in a fishing village in Tamil Nadu and by analyzing the dynamics of income inequality during this process.

Suggested Citation

  • Gine, Xavier & Klonner, Stefan, 2005. "Credit constraints as a barrier to technology adoption by the poor : lessons from South Indian small-scale fishery," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3665, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3665
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Paudel, Jayash & Crago, Christine L., 2017. "Fertilizer Subsidy and Agricultural Productivity: Empirical Evidence from Nepal," 2017 Annual Meeting, July 30-August 1, Chicago, Illinois 258464, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. B Kelsey Jack, "undated". "Market Inefficiencies and the Adoption of Agricultural Technologies in Developing Countries," CID Working Papers 50, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    3. Bonjean, Isabelle & Platteau, Jean-Philippe & Verardi, Vincenzo, 2017. "Innovation Adoption and Liquidity Constraints in the Presence of Grassroots Extension Agents: Evidence from the Peruvian Highlands," CEPR Discussion Papers 12263, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Goodspeed, Tyler Beck, 2016. "Microcredit and adjustment to environmental shock: Evidence from the Great Famine in Ireland," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 258-277.
    5. Andrew D. Foster & Mark R. Rosenzweig, 2010. "Microeconomics of Technology Adoption," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 2(1), pages 395-424, September.
    6. Acosta, Pablo & Kim, Namsuk & Melzer, Illana & Mendoza, Ronald U. & Thelen, Nina, 2011. "Business and human development in the base of the pyramid: Exploring challenges and opportunities with market heat maps," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 50-60, January.
    7. Nakano, Yuko & Kajisa, Kei, 2012. "The determinants of technology adoption: a case of the rice sector in Tanzania," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126822, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Brian Feld & Sebastian Galiani, 2015. "Climate change in Latin America and the Caribbean: policy options and research priorities," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 24(1), pages 1-39, December.
    9. Beck, Thorsten & de la Torre, Augusto, 2006. "The basic analytics of access to financial services," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4026, The World Bank.
    10. Michael R. Carter & Rachid Laajaj & Dean Yang, 2014. "Subsidies and the Persistence of Technology Adoption: Field Experimental Evidence from Mozambique," NBER Working Papers 20465, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Abay, Kibrom A. & Berhane, Guush & Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum & Koru, Bethlehem & Abay, Kibrewossen, 2016. "Understanding farmers’ technology adoption decisions: Input complementarity and heterogeneity:," ESSP working papers 82, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    12. Kimura, Yuichi, 2011. "Knowledge Diffusion and Modernization of Rural Industrial Clusters: A Paper-manufacturing Village in Northern Vietnam," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(12), pages 2105-2118.
    13. Bonjean, Isabelle, 2017. "Heterogeneous Gains From Agricultural Innovation Adoption: The Role Of The Price Effect In Peru," 2017 International Congress, August 28-September 1, 2017, Parma, Italy 260891, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    14. Kibrom A. Abay & Guush Berhane & Garrick Blalock, 2018. "Locus of Control and Technology Adoption in Africa: Evidence from Ethiopia," Working Papers PMMA 2018-04, PEP-PMMA.
    15. Goodspeed, Tyler, 2013. "Famine, Finance, and Adjustment to Environmental Shock: Microcredit and the Great Famine in Ireland," MPRA Paper 50324, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Sudha Narayanan, 2012. "Safe gambles? Farmer perceptions of transactional certainty and risk-return tradeoffs in contract farming schemes in Southern India," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2012-021, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    17. Bonjean, I., 2018. "Heterogeneous return from Agricultural Innovation Adoption: The Role of the price effect," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277257, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    18. Liverpool, Lenis Saweda O. & Winter-Nelson, Alex, 2010. "Poverty Status and the Impact of Formal Credit on Technology Use and Wellbeing among Ethiopian Smallholders," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 541-554, April.

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