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Diffusion as a Learning Process: Evidence from HYV Cotton

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  • Timothy Besley

    (Princeton University)

  • Anne Case

    (Princeton University)

Abstract

This paper develops new methods for studying the adoption of technologies that, at the time of their introduction, are of uncertain profitability. We focus on the rols played by learning in the evolution of a diffusion path and present a model that allows learning from the behavior of others as well as from the adopter's own experience. Equilibrium behavior explicitly allows for interaction between individuals when information is a public good. We consider both cooperative and non-cooperative models and apply our model to the adoption of HYV cotton in the semi-arid tropics, using data from ICRISAT village level surveys.

Suggested Citation

  • Timothy Besley & Anne Case, 1994. "Diffusion as a Learning Process: Evidence from HYV Cotton," Working Papers 228, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
  • Handle: RePEc:pri:rpdevs:174
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    1. Assar Lindbeck & J├Ârgen Weibull, 1987. "Balanced-budget redistribution as the outcome of political competition," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 52(3), pages 273-297, January.
    2. Avinash Dixit & John Londregan, 1998. "Ideology, Tactics, and Efficiency in Redistributive Politics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 113(2), pages 497-529.
    3. Timothy Besley & Stephen Coate, 1997. "An Economic Model of Representative Democracy," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, pages 85-114.
    4. Dixit, Avinash & Londregan, John, 1995. "Redistributive Politics and Economic Efficiency," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, pages 856-866.
    5. Wallis, John Joseph, 1998. "The Political Economy of New Deal Spending Revisited, Again: With and without Nevada," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 140-170, April.
    6. Snyder, James M, 1989. "Election Goals and the Allocation of Campaign Resources," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(3), pages 637-660, May.
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