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The Determinants of Technology Adoption:The Case of the Rice Sector in Tanzania

  • Nakano, Yuko
  • Kajisa, Kei

Using an extensive household-level data set collected in Tanzania, this paper investigates the determinants of technology adoption in rice cultivation by focusing on the role of credit. We find that credit enhances fertilizer use and the adoption of labor-intensive agronomic practices such as transplanting in rows, for which monitoring of hired labor is easy. We also find that new technologies are adopted more widely in irrigated areas and small-scale farmers are not at a disadvantage. Based on these findings, we argue that with appropriate policies including credit, a rice Green Revolution can improve the productivity of small-scale farmers in Tanzania.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10685/92
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File URL: http://repository.ri.jica.go.jp/dspace/bitstream/10685/92/1/JICA-RI_WP_No.58_2013.pdf
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Paper provided by JICA Research Institute in its series Working Papers with number 58.

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Date of creation: 26 Mar 2013
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Handle: RePEc:jic:wpaper:58
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  1. Otsuka, Keijiro & Kalirajan, Kaliappa P., 2005. "Special Edition on An Exploration of a Green Revolution in Sub-Saharan Africa," eJADE: electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization, Agricultural and Development Economics Division, vol. 2(1).
  2. Takeshi SAKURAI, 2006. "Intensification Of Rainfed Lowland Rice Production In West Africa: Present Status And Potential Green Revolution," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 44(2), pages 232-251.
  3. Kijima, Yoko & Otsuka, Keijiro & Sserunkuuma, Dick, 2011. "An Inquiry into Constraints on a Green Revolution in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of NERICA Rice in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 77-86, January.
  4. Andrew D. Foster & Mark R. Rosenzweig, 2010. "Microeconomics of Technology Adoption," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 2(1), pages 395-424, 09.
  5. Keijiro Otsuka & Yoko Kijima, 2010. "Technology Policies for a Green Revolution and Agricultural Transformation in Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 19(suppl_2), pages 60-76.
  6. Gine, Xavier & Klonner, Stefan, 2006. "Credit Constraints as a Barrier to Technology Adoption by the Poor: Lessons from South-Indian Small-Scale Fishery," Working Paper Series RP2006/104, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  7. Christine M. Moser & Christopher B. Barrett, 2006. "The complex dynamics of smallholder technology adoption: the case of SRI in Madagascar," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 35(3), pages 373-388, November.
  8. Andrew D. Foster & Mark R. Rosenzweig, 2010. "Microeconomics of Technology Adoption," Working Papers 984, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  9. Nakano, Yuko & Kajisa, Kei, 2012. "How does the Adoption of Modern Variety increase Productivity and Income? : A Case of the Rice Sector in Tanzania," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124924, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  10. Kajisa, Kei & Payongayong, Ellen, 2011. "Potential of and constraints to the rice Green Revolution in Mozambique: A case study of the Chokwe irrigation scheme," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 614-625, October.
  11. Carter, Michael R., 1989. "The impact of credit on peasant productivity and differentiation in Nicaragua," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 13-36, July.
  12. Seck, Papa A. & Tollens, Eric & Wopereis, Marco C.S. & Diagne, Aliou & Bamba, Ibrahim, 2010. "Rising trends and variability of rice prices: Threats and opportunities for sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 403-411, October.
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