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Enhancing Rice Production in Uganda: Impact Evaluation of a Training Program and Guidebook Distribution in Uganda

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  • Kijima, Yoko

Abstract

This paper provides an overview of rice sector development in Uganda and examines the effects of two technology dissemination programs on the enhancement of rice production in Eastern and Northern Uganda. One program was a JICA training program that provided on-the-job training at demonstration plots 3–4 times a year, while the other was to distribute a rice cultivation guidebook to households that were randomly selected. The training program was shown to have improved rice productivity. In contrast, there were no significant effects resulting from the distribution of the guidebook on technology adoption or rice production. Although the distribution of the guidebook was less costly and easier to implement than the training program, distribution of the guidebook alone cannot be a substitute for conventional training programs

Suggested Citation

  • Kijima, Yoko, 2014. "Enhancing Rice Production in Uganda: Impact Evaluation of a Training Program and Guidebook Distribution in Uganda," Working Papers 80, JICA Research Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:jic:wpaper:80
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10685/142
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    File URL: https://jicari.repo.nii.ac.jp/?action=repository_uri&item_id=689&file_id=9&file_no=1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kijima, Yoko, 2012. "Expansion of Lowland Rice Production and Constraints on a Rice Green Revolution: Evidence from Uganda," Working Papers 49, JICA Research Institute.
    2. Kajisa, Kei & Payongayong, Ellen, 2011. "Potential of and constraints to the rice Green Revolution in Mozambique: A case study of the Chokwe irrigation scheme," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 614-625, October.
    3. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-298, January.
    4. Jenny C. Aker, 2011. "Dial “A” for agriculture: a review of information and communication technologies for agricultural extension in developing countries," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 42(6), pages 631-647, November.
    5. Christopher B. Barrett & Michael R. Carter & C. Peter Timmer, 2010. "A Century-Long Perspective on Agricultural Development," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 92(2), pages 447-468.
    6. Millicent deGraft-Johnson & Aya Suzuki & Takeshi Sakurai & Keijiro Otsuka, 2014. "On the transferability of the Asian rice green revolution to rainfed areas in sub-Saharan Africa: an assessment of technology intervention in Northern Ghana," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 45(5), pages 555-570, September.
    7. Kijima, Yoko & Ito, Yukinori & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2012. "Assessing the Impact of Training on Lowland Rice Productivity in an African Setting: Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1610-1618.
    8. Yoko Kijima & Keijiro Otsuka & Dick Sserunkuuma, 2008. "Assessing the impact of NERICA on income and poverty in central and western Uganda," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 38(3), pages 327-337, May.
    9. Nakano, Yuko & Kajisa, Kei, 2013. "The Determinants of Technology Adoption:The Case of the Rice Sector in Tanzania," Working Papers 58, JICA Research Institute.
    10. Todd Benson & Samuel Mugarura & Kelly Wanda, 2008. "Impacts in Uganda of rising global food prices: the role of diversified staples and limited price transmission," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(s1), pages 513-524, November.
    11. Paul Winters & Alessandro Maffioli & Lina Salazar, 2011. "Introduction to the Special Feature: Evaluating the Impact of Agricultural Projects in Developing Countries," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(2), pages 393-402, June.
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    Keywords

    rice production ; Uganda ; program evaluation; cultivation practices ; technology adoption;

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