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To What Extent Do Improved Practices Increase Productivity of Small-Scale Rice Cultivation in A Rain-fed Area? : Evidence from Tanzania

Listed author(s):
  • Yuko Nakano

    (University of Tsukuba)

  • Yuki Tanaka

    (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies)

  • Keijiro Otsuka

    (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies)

This paper investigates the impact of training provided by a large-scale private farm on the performance of surrounding small-scale rice farmers in a rain-fed area in Tanzania. We found that the training effectively enhances the adoption of improved rice cultivation practices, paddy yield, and profit of rice cultivation by small-holder farmers. In fact, the trainees achieve paddy yield of 5 tons per hectare on average, which is remarkably high for rain-fed rice cultivation. Our results suggest high potential of small-scale rain-fed lowland rice cultivation and extension services by private large scale farms.

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Paper provided by National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies in its series GRIPS Discussion Papers with number 14-21.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2014
Handle: RePEc:ngi:dpaper:14-21
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  1. Kajisa, Kei & Payongayong, Ellen, 2011. "Potential of and constraints to the rice Green Revolution in Mozambique: A case study of the Chokwe irrigation scheme," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 614-625, October.
  2. Hayami, The late Yujiro & Godo, Yoshihisa, 2005. "Development Economics: From the Poverty to the Wealth of Nations," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, edition 3, number 9780199272716.
  3. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, January.
  4. Stoop, Willem A. & Uphoff, Norman & Kassam, Amir, 2002. "A review of agricultural research issues raised by the system of rice intensification (SRI) from Madagascar: opportunities for improving farming systems for resource-poor farmers," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 71(3), pages 249-274, March.
  5. Nhamo, Nhamo & Rodenburg, Jonne & Zenna, Negussie & Makombe, Godswill & Luzi-Kihupi, Ashura, 2014. "Narrowing the rice yield gap in East and Southern Africa: Using and adapting existing technologies," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 45-55.
  6. Seck, Papa A. & Tollens, Eric & Wopereis, Marco C.S. & Diagne, Aliou & Bamba, Ibrahim, 2010. "Rising trends and variability of rice prices: Threats and opportunities for sub-Saharan Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 403-411, October.
  7. Millicent deGraft-Johnson & Aya Suzuki & Takeshi Sakurai & Keijiro Otsuka, 2014. "On the transferability of the Asian rice green revolution to rainfed areas in sub-Saharan Africa: an assessment of technology intervention in Northern Ghana," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 45(5), pages 555-570, September.
  8. Kijima, Yoko & Ito, Yukinori & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2012. "Assessing the Impact of Training on Lowland Rice Productivity in an African Setting: Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1610-1618.
  9. Kazushi Takahashi & Christopher B. Barrett, 2014. "The System of Rice Intensification and its Impacts on Household Income and Child Schooling: Evidence from Rural Indonesia," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 96(1), pages 269-289.
  10. Otsuka, Keijiro, 2007. "Efficiency and Equity Effects of Land Markets," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, Elsevier.
  11. Christine M. Moser & Christopher B. Barrett, 2006. "The complex dynamics of smallholder technology adoption: the case of SRI in Madagascar," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 35(3), pages 373-388, November.
  12. Nakano, Yuko & Bamba, Ibrahim & Diagne, Aliou & Otsuka, Keijiro & Kajisa, Kei, 2011. "The possibility of a rice green revolution in large-scale irrigation schemes in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5560, The World Bank.
  13. Michael Johnson & Peter Hazell & Ashok Gulati, 2003. "The Role of Intermediate Factor Markets in Asia's Green Revolution: Lessons for Africa?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1211-1216.
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