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Social Networks in Ghana

Author

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  • Christopher Udry

    (Economic Growth Center, Yale University)

  • Timothy G. Conley

Abstract

In this chapter we examine social networks among farmers in a developing country. We use detailed data on economic activities and social interactions between people living in four study villages in Ghana. It is clear that economic development in this region is being shaped by the networks of information, capital and influence that permeate these communities. This chapter explores the determinants of these important economic networks. We first describe the patterns of information, capital, labor and land transaction connections that are apparent in these villages. We then discuss the interconnections between the various economic networks. We relate the functional economic networks to more fundamental social relationships between people in a reduced form analysis. Finally, we propose an equilibrium model of multi-dimensional network formation that can provide a foundation for further data collection and empirical research.

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher Udry & Timothy G. Conley, 2004. "Social Networks in Ghana," Working Papers 888, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  • Handle: RePEc:egc:wpaper:888
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    File URL: http://www.econ.yale.edu/growth_pdf/cdp888.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Endogenous Networks; Informal Credit; Social Learning;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation

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