IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wbk/wbrwps/4444.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The impoverishing effect of adverse health events : evidence from the western Balkans

Author

Listed:
  • Mendola, Mariapia
  • Bredenkamp, Caryn
  • Gragnolati, Michele

Abstract

This paper investigates the extent to which the health systems of the Western Balkans (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, Serbia, and Kosovo) have succeeded in providing financial protection against adverse health events. The authors examine disparities in health status, healthcare utilization, and out-of-pocket payments for healthcare (including informal payments), and explore the impact of healthcare expenditures on household economic status and poverty. Methodologies include (i) generating a descriptive assessment of health and healthcare disparities across socioeconomic groups, (ii) measuring the incidence and intensity of catastrophic healthcare payments, (iii) examining the effect of out-of-pocket payments on poverty headcount and poverty gap measures, and (iv) running sets of country-specific probit regressions to model the relationship between health status, healthcare utilization, and poverty. On balance, the findings show that the impact of health expenditures on household economic wellbeing and poverty is most severe in Albania and Kosovo, while Montenegro is striking for the financial protection that the health system seems to provide. Data are drawn from Living Standards and Measurement Surveys.

Suggested Citation

  • Mendola, Mariapia & Bredenkamp, Caryn & Gragnolati, Michele, 2007. "The impoverishing effect of adverse health events : evidence from the western Balkans," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4444, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4444
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2007/12/13/000158349_20071213144401/Rendered/PDF/wps4444.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paul Gertler & Jonathan Gruber, 2002. "Insuring Consumption Against Illness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 51-70, March.
    2. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-255, March-Apr.
    3. Wagstaff, Adam, 2005. "The economic consequences of health shocks," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3644, The World Bank.
    4. Eddy van Doorslaer & Owen O'Donnell & Ravindra P. Rannan-Eliya & Aparnaa Somanathan & Shiva Raj Adhikari & Charu C. Garg & Deni Harbianto & Alejandro N. Herrin & Mohammed Nazmul Huq & Shamsia Ibragimo, 2007. "Catastrophic payments for health care in Asia," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(11), pages 1159-1184.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Aran, Meltem A. & Hentschel, Jesko S., 2012. "Protection in good and bad times ? the Turkish green card health program," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6178, The World Bank.
    2. Rama Joglekar, 2008. "Can insurance reduce catastrophic out-of-pocket health expenditure?," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2008-016, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    3. Yonatan Dinku & David Fielding & Murat Genç, 2018. "Health shocks and child time allocation decisions by households: evidence from Ethiopia," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 7(1), pages 1-23, December.
    4. World Bank, 2011. "Albania - Out-of-Pocket Payments in Albania’s Health System : Trends in Household Perceptions and Experiences 2002-2008," World Bank Other Operational Studies 2784, The World Bank.
    5. Yerramilli, Pooja & Fernández, Óscar & Thomson, Sarah, 2018. "Financial protection in Europe: a systematic review of the literature and mapping of data availability," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 122(5), pages 493-508.
    6. Afis A Agboola & Oluwaseun T Esan & Oluwasegun T Afolabi & Taiwo A Soyinka & Adedunmola O Oluwaranti & Adeniji Adetayo, 2018. "Economic burden of the therapeutic management of mental illnesses and its effect on household purchasing power," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 13(9), pages 1-13, September.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Powell-Jackson, Timothy & Hanson, Kara & Whitty, Christopher J.M. & Ansah, Evelyn K., 2014. "Who benefits from free healthcare? Evidence from a randomized experiment in Ghana," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 305-319.
    2. Lindelow, Magnus & Wagstaff, Adam, 2005. "Health shocks in China : are the poor and uninsured less protected ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3740, The World Bank.
    3. Mohammad Abu-Zaineh & Habiba Romdhane & Bruno Ventelou & Jean-Paul Moatti & Arfa Chokri, 2013. "Appraising financial protection in health: the case of Tunisia," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 73-93, March.
    4. Bratti, Massimiliano & Mendola, Mariapia, 2014. "Parental health and child schooling," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 94-108.
    5. Manoj K. Pandey, 2013. "Elderly's Health Shocks and Household's Ex-ante Poverty in India," ASARC Working Papers 2013-01, The Australian National University, Australia South Asia Research Centre.
    6. repec:eid:wpaper:3/09 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Agar Brugiavini & Noemi Pace, 2011. "Extending Health Insurance: Effects of the National Health Insurance Scheme in Ghana," RSCAS Working Papers 2011/27, European University Institute.
    8. Bernal, Noelia & Carpio, Miguel A. & Klein, Tobias J., 2017. "The effects of access to health insurance: Evidence from a regression discontinuity design in Peru," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 154(C), pages 122-136.
    9. Michael Grimm, 2006. "Mortality and survivor's consumption," Working Papers DT/2006/13, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    10. Angus Deaton, 2003. "Health, Inequality, and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 41(1), pages 113-158, March.
    11. Ramses H. Abul Naga & Karine Lamiraud, 2008. "Catastrophic health expenditure and household well-being," Working Papers 0803, University of Lausanne, Institute of Health Economics and Management (IEMS).
    12. Stéphane Verguet & Ramanan Laxminarayan & Dean T. Jamison, 2015. "Universal Public Finance of Tuberculosis Treatment in India: An Extended Cost‐Effectiveness Analysis," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(3), pages 318-332, March.
    13. Kim, Younhee & Yang, Bongmin, 2011. "Relationship between catastrophic health expenditures and household incomes and expenditure patterns in South Korea," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 100(2), pages 239-246.
    14. Barnes, Kayleigh & Mukherji, Arnab & Mullen, Patrick & Sood, Neeraj, 2017. "Financial risk protection from social health insurance," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 14-29.
    15. Flores, Gabriela & O’Donnell, Owen, 2016. "Catastrophic medical expenditure risk," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 1-15.
    16. Sparrow, Robert & Suryahadi, Asep & Widyanti, Wenefrida, 2013. "Social health insurance for the poor: Targeting and impact of Indonesia's Askeskin programme," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 264-271.
    17. Tianxin Pan & Michael Palmer & Ajay Mahal & Peter Annear & Barbara McPake, 2020. "The long‐run effects of noncommunicable disease shocks," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(12), pages 1549-1565, December.
    18. Fomba Kamga, Benjamin & Kengne Kamga, Arline & Audibert, Martine, 2013. "Health and Labour Income of Wage Earners and Self-Employed Workers in Cameroon," IZA Discussion Papers 7324, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    19. Martine AUDIBERT & Pascale COMBES MOTEL & Alassane DRABO, 2010. "Global Burden of Disease and Economic Growth," Working Papers 201036, CERDI.
    20. Ahmed Shoukry Rashad & Mesbah Fathy Sharaf, 2015. "Catastrophic Economic Consequences of Healthcare Payments: Effects on Poverty Estimates in Egypt, Jordan, and Palestine," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(4), pages 1-19, November.
    21. Eddy van Doorslaer & Owen O'Donnell, 2008. "Measurement and Explanation of Inequality in Health and Health Care in Low-Income Settings," WIDER Working Paper Series DP2008-04, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Health Systems Development&Reform; Health Economics&Finance; Population Policies; Rural Poverty Reduction;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4444. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Roula I. Yazigi). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.