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Household and market production of families in a late nineteenth century American city

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  • Goldin, Claudia

Abstract

Urban families in the late nineteenth century depended upon their children as their most important source of labor income apart from the male head of household. This paper explores the determinants of the labor force participation of children over ten years old within the context of the economic theory of household and market production, using micro-level data from 1880 Philadelphia. The father's income and unemployment, the presence of the mother or father, boarders, servants, older and younger siblings, parents' literacy, ethnicity, among other variables are used in a probity analysis of the labor force participation of children. The results validate the economic theory of household and market production demonstrating, in particular, substitution between mothers and their daughters and the role of comparative advantage in family decisions concerning the allocation of their members' time. Ethnic differences were only important for daughters.
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  • Goldin, Claudia, 1979. "Household and market production of families in a late nineteenth century American city," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 111-131, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:16:y:1979:i:2:p:111-131
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    Cited by:

    1. Motkuri, Venkatanarayana, 2006. "Child Labour and Educational Deprivation of Children : A Review of Literature," MPRA Paper 48437, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Sim, Armand & Suryadarma, Daniel & Suryahadi, Asep, 2017. "The Consequences of Child Market Work on the Growth of Human Capital," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 144-155.
    3. Sonja Fagernäs, 2011. "Protection through Proof of Age. Birth Registration and Child Labor in Early 20th Century USA," Working Paper Series 2311, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    4. Edmonds, Eric V., 2008. "Child Labor," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
    5. Ilyana Kuziemko & Joseph Ferrie, 2014. "The Role of Immigrant Children in Their Parents' Assimilation in the United States, 1850–2010," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital in History: The American Record, pages 97-120 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Lleras-Muney, Adriana, 2002. "Were Compulsory Attendance and Child Labor Laws Effective? An Analysis from 1915 to 1939," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 45(2), pages 401-435, October.
    7. Dessy, Sylvain & Knowles, John, 2008. "Why is child labor illegal?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(7), pages 1275-1311, October.
    8. Dora L. Costa, 1993. "Explaining the Changing Dynamics of Unemployment: Evidence from Civil War Records," NBER Historical Working Papers 0051, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Shirit Katav-Herz, 2003. "A Model of Parental Demand for Child Labor with High Fertility Norms," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 219-233, September.
    10. Dessy, Sylvain E., 2003. "Endogenous Technical Progress and the Emergence of Child Labor Laws," Cahiers de recherche 0302, Université Laval - Département d'économique.
    11. Margo, Robert A, 1987. "Accounting for Racial Differences in School Attendance in the American South, 1900: The Role of Separate-but-Equal," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(4), pages 661-666, November.
    12. Fabre, Alice & Pallage, Stéphane, 2015. "Child labor, idiosyncratic shocks, and social policy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 394-411.
    13. Dirk Krueger & Jessica Tjornhom Donohue, 2005. "On The Distributional Consequences Of Child Labor Legislation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 46(3), pages 785-815, August.
    14. Kaushik Basu, 1999. "Child Labor: Cause, Consequence, and Cure, with Remarks on International Labor Standards," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(3), pages 1083-1119, September.
    15. Motkuri, Venkatanarayana, 2004. "Child Labour and Schooling in a Histrical Perspective: The Developed Countries Experience," MPRA Paper 48416, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Mariapia Mendola, 2016. "How does migration affect child labor in sending countries?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 286-286, August.
    17. De Paoli, Anna & Mendola, Mariapia, 2014. "International Labor Mobility and Child Work in Developing Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 8066, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    18. Yonatan Dinku & David Fielding & Murat Genc, 2017. "Health Shocks and Child Time Allocation Decisions by Households: Evidence from Ethiopia," Working Papers 1705, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2017.
    19. Moehling, Carolyn M., 1999. "State Child Labor Laws and the Decline of Child Labor," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 72-106, January.
    20. Domènech, Jordi & Elu-Terán, Alexander, 2008. "Women's Paid Work in an Urban Developing Economy. Barcelona in 1930," Revista de Historia Económica, Cambridge University Press, vol. 26(03), pages 375-401, January.

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    JEL classification:

    • L66 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing - - - Food; Beverages; Cosmetics; Tobacco

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