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Child labor and schooling responses to production and health shocks in northern Mali:

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  • Dillon, Andrew

Abstract

"This paper investigates children's time allocation to schooling, home production, and market production using a unique data set collected from northern Mali. Production shocks from harvest period pest infestations induce households to withdraw children from school and increase the probability that they are selected into farm work. Health shocks to women increases the probability that a child participates in the family business and childcare activities. These results are robust to varying assumptions about the structure of unobserved heterogeneity at the household and village levels. Different measures of household assets are also constructed to test whether assets serve as a buffer against increased child labor in response to shocks. Assets such as livestock have mixed effects on child labor and schooling, depending on the shock and asset type. However, household durables are substitutes for increased child labor when households face health shocks." from Author's Abstract

Suggested Citation

  • Dillon, Andrew, 2008. "Child labor and schooling responses to production and health shocks in northern Mali:," IFPRI discussion papers 755, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:755
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eme:rleczz:s0147-9121(2010)0000031008 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Eric V. Edmonds & Norbert Schady, 2012. "Poverty Alleviation and Child Labor," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 100-124, November.
    3. Amao, Ifeoluwapo & Akinlade, Roseline, 2014. "Child labour among Horticultural Households in Bauchi State, Nigeria: A gender perspective," MPRA Paper 55708, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Alam, Shamma Adeeb, 2015. "Parental health shocks, child labor and educational outcomes: Evidence from Tanzania," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 161-175.
    5. Dillon, Andrew, 2009. "Measuring child labor: Comparisons between hours data and subjective measures," IFPRI discussion papers 879, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child labor; Production shocks; Health shocks; Labor substitution effects; Schooling; Education; Gender; Women;

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