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Trade-off between Child Labour and Schooling in Bangladesh: Role of Parental Education

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  • Salma Ahmed

Abstract

The paper examines whether there is any trade-off between child labour hours and child schooling outcomes. By drawing on Bangladesh National Child Labour Survey data, we find that children’s work, even in limited amounts, does adversely affect child human capital. This is reflected in reduced school attendance and age-adjusted school attendance rates. We find that parents do not have identical preferences towards boys’ and girls’ schooling decisions. While both, educated mother and father shifts the trade-off towards girls’ schooling as opposed to market work, the differential impact of mother’s education on girls is significantly larger. These conclusions persist even after allowing for sample selection into child’s work. Our results intensify the call for better enforcement of compulsory schooling for children.

Suggested Citation

  • Salma Ahmed, 2011. "Trade-off between Child Labour and Schooling in Bangladesh: Role of Parental Education," Monash Economics Working Papers 21-11, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:2011-21
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    File URL: http://www.buseco.monash.edu.au/eco/research/papers/2011/2111tradeoffchildlabourahmed.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Hideo Akabayashi & George Psacharopoulos, 1999. "The trade-off between child labour and human capital formation: A Tanzanian case study," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(5), pages 120-140.
    7. Ravallion, Martin & Wodon, Quentin, 2000. "Does Child Labour Displace Schooling? Evidence on Behavioural Responses to an Enrollment Subsidy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 158-175, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Genereuse, Umuhoza, 2012. "Analysis of Factors Influencing Women Participation in Coffee Value Chain in Huye District, Rwanda," Research Theses 243451, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child labour; education; Bangladesh;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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