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The dynamics of school and work in rural Bangladesh


  • Canals-Cerda, Jose
  • Ridao-Cano, Cristobal


Canals-Cerd? and Ridao-Cano investigate the effect of work on the school progress of rural Bangladeshi children. They specify a dynamic switching model for the sequence of school and work outcomes up to the end of secondary school, where the switching in each school level is determined by the endogenous work history of the child up to that level. This approach allows the authors to evaluate the dynamic effects of work on school progress. They find that work has a negative and sizable effect on school progress and are able to measure this effect for different groups of children. Their results highlight the relevance of policies aimed at increasing school progress through reductions in child work and the importance of accompanying these policies by efforts to improve the adverse environment that working children face. The authors evaluate the dynamic effects of three policies: compulsory primary schooling, compulsory school entry at age six, and universal access to secondary school. They find that these policies have a sizable effect on school progress and child labor.

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  • Canals-Cerda, Jose & Ridao-Cano, Cristobal, 2004. "The dynamics of school and work in rural Bangladesh," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3330, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3330

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Ravallion, Martin & Wodon, Quentin, 2000. "Does Child Labour Displace Schooling? Evidence on Behavioural Responses to an Enrollment Subsidy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 158-175, March.
    9. Paul Schultz, T., 2004. "School subsidies for the poor: evaluating the Mexican Progresa poverty program," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 199-250, June.
    10. Sawada, Yasayuki & Lokshin, Michael, 2001. "Household schooling decisions in rural Pakistan," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2541, The World Bank.
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    13. Jaap H. Abbring & Gerard J. van den Berg, 2003. "The Nonparametric Identification of Treatment Effects in Duration Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(5), pages 1491-1517, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Patrick M. Emerson & Vladimir Ponczek & André Portela Souza, 2017. "Child Labor and Learning," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65(2), pages 265-296.
    2. Christelle Dumas, 2012. "Does Work Impede Child Learning? The Case of Senegal," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 60(4), pages 773-793.
    3. World Bank, 2005. "Cambodia : Quality Basic Education for All," World Bank Other Operational Studies 8643, The World Bank.
    4. de Janvry, Alain & Finan, Frederico & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 2004. "Can Conditional Cash Transfers Serve as Safety Nets to Keep Children at School and Out of the Labor Market?," Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley, Working Paper Series qt5fp0g5p2, Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley.
    5. de Janvry, Alain & Finan, Frederico & Sadoulet, Elisabeth & Vakis, Renos, 2006. "Can conditional cash transfer programs serve as safety nets in keeping children at school and from working when exposed to shocks?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 349-373, April.
    6. Ragui Assaad & Deborah Levison & Nadia Zibani, 2010. "The Effect of Domestic Work on Girls' Schooling: Evidence from Egypt," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 79-128.

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    Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Adolescent Health; Urban Housing; TF054599-PHRD-KYRGYZ REPUBLIC: WATER MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENT PROJECT; Curriculum&Instruction;

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