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The Effect of Domestic Work on Girls' Schooling: Evidence from Egypt

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  • Ragui Assaad
  • Deborah Levison
  • Nadia Zibani

Abstract

In Egypt, girls' work primarily takes the form of domestic tasks, which are not considered in many studies of child labor. This paper investigates the effect of girls' work on their school attendance. It uses a modified bivariate probit approach to estimate the effect of work on schooling while allowing for the simultaneous determination of the two outcomes. It presents evidence that the substantial burden of girls' domestic work leads to lower rates of school attendance. Policies that attempt to ban the labor-force work of children will have practically no effect on girls' education in Egypt, while interventions reducing the drudgery of household labor through, for example, improved water and sanitation infrastructure, have better prospects for success.

Suggested Citation

  • Ragui Assaad & Deborah Levison & Nadia Zibani, 2010. "The Effect of Domestic Work on Girls' Schooling: Evidence from Egypt," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 79-128.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:16:y:2010:i:1:p:79-128
    DOI: 10.1080/13545700903382729
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nadir Altinok & Abdurrahman Aydemir, 2015. "The Unfolding of Gender Gap in Education," Working Papers halshs-01204805, HAL.
    2. Sudha Narayanan & Sowmya Dhanraj, 2013. "Child Work and Schooling in Rural North India: What do Time Use Data Say about Tradeoffs and Drivers of Human Capital Investment?," Working Papers id:5597, eSocialSciences.
    3. Abou, Pokou Edouard, 2015. "Incidence du travail domestique, des caractéristiques de l’école et du ménage sur les résultats scolaires des filles en Côte d’Ivoire
      [Incidence of domestic work, school and household characteristi
      ," MPRA Paper 43976, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. repec:pal:eurjdr:v:30:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1057_s41287-017-0079-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Claus Pörtner, 2016. "Effects of parental absence on child labor and school attendance in the Philippines," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 103-130, March.
    6. repec:eee:injoed:v:56:y:2017:i:c:p:1-10 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:zbw:espost:173233 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:eee:cysrev:v:86:y:2018:i:c:p:246-255 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Webbink, Ellen & Smits, Jeroen & de Jong, Eelke, 2012. "Hidden Child Labor: Determinants of Housework and Family Business Work of Children in 16 Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 631-642.
    10. Caroline Krafft & Safaa El-Kogali, 2014. "Inequalities in Early Childhood Development in the Middle East and North Africa," Working Papers 856, Economic Research Forum, revised Nov 2014.

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