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Child work and schooling in rural north India: What do time use data say about tradeoffs and drivers of human capital investment?

  • Sudha Narayanan

    ()

    (Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research)

  • Sowmya Dhanraj

    ()

    (Indira Gandhi Institute of Development ResearchInstitute of Economic Growth)

This study examines time use data for 1244 children in the age-group 6-12 years in 274 villages in eight states in rural north India to understand the tradeoffs between time spent in school, time spent at work, time spent on home study and liesure. Using a Seemingly Unrelated Regression (SURE) model, we find that only a few variables influence allocation of time to different activities across the board. Overall, there seems to be no tradeoff between time spent at school and at work, whereas leisure time and home study appear to be compromised for the sake of work.

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File URL: http://www.igidr.ac.in/pdf/publication/WP-2013-023.pdf
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Paper provided by Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India in its series Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers with number 2013-023.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ind:igiwpp:2013-023
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