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Why Children Aren't Attending School: The Case of Northwestern Tanzania

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  • Kathleen Burke
  • Kathleen Beegle

Abstract

Policies designed to increase education in low-income settings require an understanding of why children do not attend school. Drawing on longitudinal data of primary-school age children in Tanzania, our analysis evaluates the role various dimensions in determining children's attendance. Our results indicate that policies directed towards increasing a child's attendance need to be focused on the demand for schooling within the context of the household. Policies that affect demand for child labour within the household, especially those that promote substitutes for child labour, should be considered. Furthermore, programmes aimed at secondary schools (including improving access) can have an indirect affect on hours of primary-school attendance, particularly for girls. Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Kathleen Burke & Kathleen Beegle, 2004. "Why Children Aren't Attending School: The Case of Northwestern Tanzania," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 13(2), pages 333-355, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:13:y:2004:i:2:p:333-355
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Seshie-Nasser, Hellen A. & Oduro, Abena D., 2016. "Delayed primary school enrolment among boys and girls in Ghana," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 107-114.
    2. Mukhopadhyay, Abhiroop & Sahoo, Soham, 2016. "Does access to secondary education affect primary schooling? Evidence from India," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 124-142.
    3. Sudha Narayanan & Sowmya Dhanraj, 2013. "Child Work and Schooling in Rural North India: What do Time Use Data Say about Tradeoffs and Drivers of Human Capital Investment?," Working Papers id:5597, eSocialSciences.
    4. Florence Kondylis & Marco Manacorda, 2012. "School Proximity and Child Labor: Evidence from Rural Tanzania," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 47(1), pages 32-63.
    5. Ismayilova, Leyla & Ssewamala, Fred & Mooers, Elizabeth & Nabunya, Proscovia & Sheshadri, Srividya, 2012. "Imagining the future: Community perceptions of a family-based economic empowerment intervention for AIDS-orphaned adolescents in Uganda," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 2042-2051.
    6. Rodriguez Takeuchi Laura, 2015. "Intra-Household Inequalities in Child Rights and Well-Being: A Barrier to Progress?," WIDER Working Paper Series 012, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Nerman, Måns & Owens, Trudy, 2010. "The Push Towards UPE and the Determinants of the Demand for Education in Tanzania," Working Papers in Economics 472, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics, revised 13 Mar 2012.
    8. Rodríguez, Laura, 2016. "Intrahousehold Inequalities in Child Rights and Well-Being. A Barrier to Progress?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 111-134.
    9. Deon Filmer, 2007. "If you build it, will they come? School availability and school enrolment in 21 poor countries," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(5), pages 901-928.
    10. Kahyarara, Godius & Teal, Francis, 2008. "The Returns to Vocational Training and Academic Education: Evidence from Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 2223-2242, November.
    11. Hilson, Gavin, 2012. "Family Hardship and Cultural Values: Child Labor in Malian Small-Scale Gold Mining Communities," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1663-1674.
    12. Marito Garcia & Jean Fares, 2008. "Youth in Africa's Labor Market," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6578.
    13. Smith, W. James, 2011. "Tanzania - Poverty, growth, and public transfers : options for a national productive safety net program," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 91575, The World Bank.
    14. David Dreyer Lassen & Helene Bie Lilleør, 2008. "Informal Institutions and Intergenerational Contracts: Evidence from Schooling and Remittances in Rural Tanzania," CAM Working Papers 2008-03, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics.
    15. Dehejia, Rajeev H. & Beegle, Kathleen & Gatti, Roberta, 2003. "Child labor, income shocks, and access to credit," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3075, The World Bank.
    16. Francis Teal & Godius Kahyarara, 2008. "The returns to vocational training and academic education: Evidence from Tanzania," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2008-07, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    17. Beegle, Kathleen & Dehejia, Rajeev H. & Gatti, Roberta, 2006. "Child labor and agricultural shocks," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 80-96, October.
    18. Goensch, Iris, 2013. "Does the availability of secondary schools increase primary schooling? Empirical evidence from northern Senegal," Discussion Papers 63, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Center for international Development and Environmental Research (ZEU).

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