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School Attendance, Child Labor and Local Labor Market Fluctuations in Urban Brazil

  • Duryea, Suzanne
  • Arends-Kuenning, Mary

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VC6-48NX3SS-2/2/4b875c480861829397801f9c69420e76
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

Volume (Year): 31 (2003)
Issue (Month): 7 (July)
Pages: 1165-1178

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Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:31:y:2003:i:7:p:1165-1178
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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  1. Schady, Norbert R., 2002. "The (positive) effect of macroeconomic crises on the schoolingand employment decisions of children in a middle-income country," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2762, The World Bank.
  2. Peter Jensen & Helena Skyt Nielsen, 1997. "Child labour or school attendance? Evidence from Zambia," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 407-424.
  3. Peter R. Fallon & Robert E. B. Lucas, 2002. "The Impact of Financial Crises on Labor Markets, Household Incomes, and Poverty: A Review of Evidence," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 17(1), pages 21-45.
  4. Karnit Flug & Antonio Spilimbergo & Erik Wachtenheim, 1996. "Investment in Education: Do Economic Volatility and Credit Constraints Matter?," Research Department Publications 4000, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  5. Levison, Deborah & Moe, Karine S. & Marie Knaul, Felicia, 2001. "Youth Education and Work in Mexico," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 167-188, January.
  6. Skoufias, Emmanual & Parker, Susan W., 2002. "Labor market shocks and their impacts on work and schooling," FCND briefs 129, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  7. Neri, Marcelo Cortes & Thomas, Mark R., 2000. "Macro Shocks and Microeconomic Instability: an Episodic Analysis of Booms and Recessions," Economics Working Papers (Ensaios Economicos da EPGE) 391, FGV/EPGE Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finan├žas, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil).
  8. Gavin Jones & Peter Hagul, 2001. "Schooling In Indonesia: Crisis-Related And Longer-Term Issues," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 207-231.
  9. Bedi, Arjun S & Marshall, Jeffrey H, 1999. "School Attendance and Student Achievement: Evidence from Rural Honduras," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(3), pages 657-82, April.
  10. Binder, Melissa, 1999. "Schooling indicators during Mexico's "Lost decade"," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 183-199, April.
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