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Macroeconomic conditions and child schooling in Turkey

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  • Gunes, Pinar Mine
  • Ural Marchand, Beyza

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of macroeconomic shocks on child schooling in Turkey using household labor force surveys from 2005–2013. We use variation in local labor demand as an instrumental variable, particularly regional industry composition and national industry employment growth rates. The results demonstrate that child schooling is pro-cyclical in Turkey, with the most acute effects among children with less educated parents and living in rural areas. Finally, as hypothesized, we find asymmetric effects on child schooling based on skill composition of employment growth–higher unemployment among unskilled workers increases schooling, whereas higher unemployment among skilled workers decreases schooling.

Suggested Citation

  • Gunes, Pinar Mine & Ural Marchand, Beyza, 2020. "Macroeconomic conditions and child schooling in Turkey," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:63:y:2020:i:c:s0927537120300154
    DOI: 10.1016/j.labeco.2020.101809
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Schooling; Unemployment; Business cycles; Turkey;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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