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Local unemployment and the timing of post-secondary schooling

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  • Sievertsen, Hans Henrik

Abstract

Using Danish administrative data on all high school graduates from 1984 to 1992, I show that local unemployment has both a short- and a long-run effect on school enrollment and completion. The short-run effect causes students to advance their enrollment, and consequently their completion, of additional schooling. The long-run effect causes students who would otherwise never have enrolled to enroll and complete schooling. The effects are strongest for children of parents with no higher education.

Suggested Citation

  • Sievertsen, Hans Henrik, 2016. "Local unemployment and the timing of post-secondary schooling," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 17-28.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:50:y:2016:i:c:p:17-28
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2015.11.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gunes, Pinar & Ural Marchand, Beyza, 2018. "Macroeconomic Conditions and Child Schooling in Turkey," Working Papers 2018-10, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
    2. Jan Marcus & Vaishali Zambre, 2016. "The Effect of Increasing Education Efficiency on University Enrollment: Evidence from Administrative Data and an Unusual Schooling Reform in Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1613, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demand for schooling; Post-secondary education; Local labor markets;

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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