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Does work impede child's learning? The case of Senegal

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  • Christelle Dumas

    () (University Cergy-Pontoise-Thema. 33, bd du Port. 95011 Cergy-Pontoise. France.)

Abstract

This paper assesses the impact of labor performed during childhood on cognitive achievement of teenagers, measured by tests. Introduction of community fixed effects and use of multiple tests taken at the entry of primary school allows to control for unobserved heterogeneity and mea- surement error in the entry tests. We find no detrimental impact of par- ticipation of children to economic activities on their subsequent learning once controlling for the number of years of education but rather a pos- itive, though small, impact. This could come from increased monetary resources. Working more than 4 hours a week or as an employee though prevents the child to learn as much as the other children.

Suggested Citation

  • Christelle Dumas, 2008. "Does work impede child's learning? The case of Senegal," THEMA Working Papers 2008-01, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
  • Handle: RePEc:ema:worpap:2008-01
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Heady, Christopher, 2003. "The Effect of Child Labor on Learning Achievement," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 385-398, February.
    2. Christelle Dumas & Sylvie Lambert, 2011. "Educational Achievement and Socio-economic Background: Causality and Mechanisms in Senegal," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 20(1), pages 1-26, January.
    3. Becker, Gary S & Tomes, Nigel, 1976. "Child Endowments and the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages 143-162, August.
    4. Kathleen Beegle & Rajeev Dehejia & Roberta Gatti, 2009. "Why Should We Care About Child Labor?: The Education, Labor Market, and Health Consequences of Child Labor," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(4).
    5. John H. Tyler, 2003. "Using State Child Labor Laws to Identify the Effect of School-Year Work on High School Achievement," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(2), pages 353-380, April.
    6. Ralph Stinebrickner & Todd R. Stinebrickner, 2003. "Working during School and Academic Performance," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 21(2), pages 449-472, April.
    7. Emerson, Patrick M. & Souza, André Portela, 2008. "Birth Order, Child Labor, and School Attendance in Brazil," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 1647-1664, September.
    8. Hideo Akabayashi & George Psacharopoulos, 1999. "The trade-off between child labour and human capital formation: A Tanzanian case study," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(5), pages 120-140.
    9. Canals-Cerda, Jose & Ridao-Cano, Cristobal, 2004. "The dynamics of school and work in rural Bangladesh," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3330, The World Bank.
    10. John Shea, 1997. "Instrument Relevance in Multivariate Linear Models: A Simple Measure," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(2), pages 348-352, May.
    11. Hanushek, Eric, 1971. "Teacher Characteristics and Gains in Student Achievement: Estimation Using Micro Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(2), pages 280-288, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Patrick M. Emerson & Vladimir Ponczek & André Portela Souza, 2017. "Child Labor and Learning," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65(2), pages 265-296.
    2. Sim, Armand & Suryadarma, Daniel & Suryahadi, Asep, 2017. "The Consequences of Child Market Work on the Growth of Human Capital," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 144-155.
    3. repec:eme:rleczz:s0147-912120140000040007 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Claus C. Pörtner, 2016. "Effects of parental absence on child labor and school attendance in the Philippines," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 103-130, March.
    5. Mauricio Moura & Rodrigo Bueno, 2014. "The Effect of Land Title on Child Labor Supply: Empirical Evidence from Brazil," Research in Labor Economics,in: Factors Affecting Worker Well-being: The Impact of Change in the Labor Market, volume 40, pages 195-222 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    6. Kuepie, Mathias & Misangumukini, Nicaise, 2012. "Environnements économique et éducatif des ménages et difficultés scolaires des enfants au Mali," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 88(4), pages 403-428, Décembre.
    7. BOUARÉ Issa & KUEPIE Mathias & MISANGUMUKINI Nicaise, 2010. "Environnements économique et éducatif des ménages et échec scolaire des enfants au Mali," LISER Working Paper Series 2010-02, LISER.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child labor; Human capital; multiple-indicator; fixed effects.;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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