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An Empirical Illustration of Positive Stigma towards Child Labor

Author

Listed:
  • Harry A Patrinos

    (The World Bank)

  • Najeeb Shafiq

    (Indiana University at Bloomington)

Abstract

This empirical note complements the qualitative and theoretical research on positive household stigma towards child labor. We use data from Guatemala and two instruments for measuring stigma: a child's indigenous background and household head's childhood work experience. We then adopt binomial probit regression methods to illustrate that positive stigma has a large effect on child labor practices, and a modest effect on school enrollment.

Suggested Citation

  • Harry A Patrinos & Najeeb Shafiq, 2010. "An Empirical Illustration of Positive Stigma towards Child Labor," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 30(1), pages 799-807.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00337
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Edmonds, Eric V., 2008. "Child Labor," Handbook of Development Economics, in: T. Paul Schultz & John A. Strauss (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 57, pages 3607-3709, Elsevier.
    2. Basu, Kaushik & Van, Pham Hoang, 1998. "The Economics of Child Labor," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 412-427, June.
    3. Gillette Hall & Harry Anthony Patrinos (ed.), 2006. "Indigenous Peoples, Poverty and Human Development in Latin America," Palgrave Macmillan Books, Palgrave Macmillan, number 978-0-230-37722-6, June.
    4. T. Paul Schultz & John A. Strauss (ed.), 2008. "Handbook of Development Economics," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier, edition 1, volume 4, number 5.
    5. Bowles, Samuel & Gintis, Herbert, 2004. "Persistent parochialism: trust and exclusion in ethnic networks," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 1-23, September.
    6. Sarmistha Pal, 2009. "Norms, Culture and Local Infrastructure: Evidence from Indonesia," CEDI Discussion Paper Series 09-08, Centre for Economic Development and Institutions(CEDI), Brunel University.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Heather Congdon Fors, 2012. "Child Labour: A Review Of Recent Theory And Evidence With Policy Implications," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(4), pages 570-593, September.
    2. Krauss, Alexander, 2017. "Understanding child labour beyond the standard economic assumption of monetary poverty," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 68497, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Basu, Arnab K. & Dimova, Ralitza, 2020. "Household Behavioral Preferences and the Child Labor-Education Trade-off: Framed Field Experimental Evidence from Ethiopia," IZA Discussion Papers 13011, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Congdon Fors, Heather, 2012. "Social Globalization and Child Labor," Working Papers in Economics 533, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    5. Basu, Arnab K. & Dimova, Ralitza, 2021. "Household Preferences and Child Labor in Rural Ethiopia," IZA Discussion Papers 14062, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    6. Heather Congdon Fors, 2014. "Social Globalization and Child Labor: A Cross-country Analysis," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 52(2), pages 125-153, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    child labor; education; indigenous; stigma; Guatemala;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development

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