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Felix Ritchie

Personal Details

First Name:Felix
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ritchie
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pri301
http://www.felixritchie.co.uk/

Affiliation

Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance
Bristol Business School
University of the West of England

Bristol, United Kingdom
http://www.uwe.ac.uk/bbs/about/schools/econ.shtml

0117 328 3610

0117 328 3610
RePEc:edi:seuweuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Hans-Peter Hafner & Felix Ritchie & Rainer Lenz, 2015. "User-focused threat identification for anonymised microdata," Working Papers 20151503, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  2. Felix Ritchie & Mark Elliot, 2015. "Principles- versus rules-based output statistical disclosure control in remote access environments," Working Papers 20151501, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  3. Felix Ritchie, 2014. "Resistance to change in government: risk, inertia and incentives," Working Papers 20141412, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  4. Hilary Drew & Anna King & Ritchie Felix, 2014. "How do knowledge brokers work? The case of WERS," Working Papers 20141403, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  5. Felix Ritchie, 2014. "Operationalising ‘safe statistics’: the case of linear regression," Working Papers 20141410, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  6. Felix Ritchie & Richard Welpton, 2014. "Addressing the human factor in data access: incentive compatibility, legitimacy and cost-effectiveness in public data resources," Working Papers 20141413, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  7. Suzanne Fry & Felix Ritchie, 2012. "Issues in the measurement of low pay: 2010," Working Papers 20121210, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  8. Felix Ritchie & Andrew D. Thomas & Richard Welpton, 2012. "What is a manufacturing job?," Working Papers 20121218, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  9. Felix Richie, 2012. "Output-based disclosure control for regressions," Working Papers 20121209, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  10. Hart, Robert A. & Ritchie, Felix, 1999. "Tenure-based Wage Setting," IZA Discussion Papers 47, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  11. Felix Ritchie & David Bell, 1995. "Collinearity and Identification in Varying-Coefficient Panel Estimators," Working Papers Series 95/5, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
  12. Felix Ritchie & David Bell, 1995. "Female Earnings in Great Britain 1977-1990: Some Evidence from the New Earnings Survey," Working Papers Series 95/6, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
  13. Felix Ritchie, 1995. "Efficient Access to Large Datasets for Linear Regression Models," Working Papers Series 95/12, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
  14. David Bell & Felix Ritchie, "undated". "Time-varing Parameters in Panel Models," Working Papers Series 96/11, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
  15. David Bell & Felix Ritchie, "undated". "Female Earnings and Gender Differentials in Great Britain 1977-1990," Working Papers Series 96/9, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
  16. Felix Ritchie, "undated". "Observation Histories: A Compression Technique for Recording Discrete States," Computing in Economics and Finance 1996 _051, Society for Computational Economics.

Articles

  1. Ritchie Felix, 2014. "Access to Sensitive Data: Satisfying Objectives Rather than Constraints," Journal of Official Statistics, Sciendo, vol. 30(3), pages 1-13, September.
  2. Tullio Buccellato & Dominic Webber & Sean White & Felix Ritchie & Shadia Begum, 2010. "The economic impact of tourism across regions and nations of the UK," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 4(5), pages 44-50, May.
  3. Caroline Ritchie & Felix Ritchie & Richard Ward, 2009. "How can I drink safely? Perception versus the reality of alcohol consumption," The Service Industries Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(10), pages 1397-1411, May.
  4. Felix Ritchie, 2008. "Secure access to confidential microdata: four years of the Virtual Microdata Laboratory," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 2(5), pages 29-34, May.
  5. Robert Hayes & Catrin Omerod & Felix Ritchie, 2007. "Earnings: summary of sources and developments," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 1(1), pages 42-47, January.
  6. Catrin Ormerod & Felix Ritchie, 2007. "Measuring low pay: the importance of timing," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 1(4), pages 18-22, April.
  7. Catrin Ormerod & Felix Ritchie, 2007. "Issues in the measurement of low pay," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 1(6), pages 37-45, June.
  8. Catrin Ormerod & Felix Ritchie, 2007. "Linking ASHE and LFS: can the main earnings sources be reconciled?," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 1(3), pages 24-31, March.
  9. Bell, David & Ritchie, Felix, 1998. "Female earnings and gender differentials in Great Britain 1977-1994," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 331-357, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Hans-Peter Hafner & Felix Ritchie & Rainer Lenz, 2015. "User-focused threat identification for anonymised microdata," Working Papers 20151503, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.

    Cited by:

    1. Rainer Lenz, 2016. "Recent advances in cyclic perturbation of frequency tables [Neue Entwicklungen in der zyklischen Überlagerung von Fallzahltabellen]," AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv, Springer;Deutsche Statistische Gesellschaft - German Statistical Society, vol. 10(1), pages 37-62, February.
    2. Ritchie, Felix, 2017. "Spontaneous recognition: an unnecessary control on data access?," Statistics Paper Series 24, European Central Bank.
    3. Rainer Lenz, 2016. "Recent advances in cyclic perturbation of frequency tables," AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv, Springer;Deutsche Statistische Gesellschaft - German Statistical Society, vol. 10(1), pages 37-62, February.
    4. Tanvi Desai & Felix Ritchie & Richard Welpton, 2016. "Five Safes: designing data access for research," Working Papers 20161601, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    5. Felix Ritchie & Jim Smith, 2019. "Confidentiality and linked data," Papers 1907.06465, arXiv.org.

  2. Felix Ritchie & Mark Elliot, 2015. "Principles- versus rules-based output statistical disclosure control in remote access environments," Working Papers 20151501, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.

    Cited by:

    1. Talei Parker, 2017. "The DataLab of the Australian Bureau of Statistics," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 50(4), pages 478-483, December.
    2. Tanvi Desai & Felix Ritchie & Richard Welpton, 2016. "Five Safes: designing data access for research," Working Papers 20161601, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.

  3. Felix Ritchie, 2014. "Resistance to change in government: risk, inertia and incentives," Working Papers 20141412, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.

    Cited by:

    1. Ritchie, Felix, 2017. "Spontaneous recognition: an unnecessary control on data access?," Statistics Paper Series 24, European Central Bank.
    2. Felix Ritchie & Mark Elliot, 2015. "Principles- versus rules-based output statistical disclosure control in remote access environments," Working Papers 20151501, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    3. Torugsa, Nuttaneeya (Ann) & Arundel, Anthony, 2017. "Rethinking the effect of risk aversion on the benefits of service innovations in public administration agencies," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(5), pages 900-910.
    4. Felix Ritchie & Richard Welpton, 2014. "Addressing the human factor in data access: incentive compatibility, legitimacy and cost-effectiveness in public data resources," Working Papers 20141413, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.

  4. Felix Ritchie, 2014. "Operationalising ‘safe statistics’: the case of linear regression," Working Papers 20141410, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.

    Cited by:

    1. Felix Ritchie & Jim Smith, 2019. "Confidentiality and linked data," Papers 1907.06465, arXiv.org.

  5. Suzanne Fry & Felix Ritchie, 2012. "Issues in the measurement of low pay: 2010," Working Papers 20121210, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.

    Cited by:

    1. Woon Wong & Iris Biefang-Frisancho Mariscal & Wanru Yao & Peter Howells, 2013. "Liquidity and credit risks in the UK’s financial crisis," Working Papers 20131301, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    2. Wessam Abouarghoub & Iris Biefang-Frisancho Mariscal & Peter Howells, 2013. "A two-state Markov-switching distinctive conditional variance application for tanker freight returns," Working Papers 20131314, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    3. Iris Biefang-Frisancho Mariscal, 2013. "Risk-taking and monetary policy before the crisis: The case of Germany," Working Papers 20131308, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    4. Hilary Drew & Anna King & Ritchie Felix, 2014. "How do knowledge brokers work? The case of WERS," Working Papers 20141403, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    5. Wessam Abouarghoub & Iris Biefang-Frisancho Mariscal, 2013. "Measuring the level of risk exposure in tanker shipping freight markets," Working Papers 20131313, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    6. Peter Howells, 2013. "The US Fed and the Bank of England: Ownership, structure and 'independence'," Working Papers 20131311, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    7. Croucher, Richard & Ramakrishnan, Sumeetra & Rizov, Marian & Benzinger, Diana, 2015. "Perceptions of employability among London’s low-paid: ‘Self-determination’ or ethnicity?," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 109-130.

  6. Hart, Robert A. & Ritchie, Felix, 1999. "Tenure-based Wage Setting," IZA Discussion Papers 47, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Josef Zweimüller & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2000. "Firm-specific training: Consequences for job mobility," Economics working papers 2000-06, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    2. Alison Booth & Mark L. Bryan, 2006. "Training, Minimum Wages and the Earnings Distribution," CEPR Discussion Papers 537, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    3. Saint-Paul, Gilles, 2000. "Flexibility vs. Rigidity: Does Spain have the worst of both Worlds?," IZA Discussion Papers 144, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Booth, Alison L. & Bryan, Mark L., 2002. "Who Pays for General Training? New Evidence for British Men and Women," IZA Discussion Papers 486, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  7. Felix Ritchie, 1995. "Efficient Access to Large Datasets for Linear Regression Models," Working Papers Series 95/12, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Cornelissen, Thomas & Hübler, Olaf, 2007. "Unobserved Individual and Firm Heterogeneity in Wage and Tenure Functions: Evidence from German Linked Employer-Employee Data," IZA Discussion Papers 2741, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  8. David Bell & Felix Ritchie, "undated". "Time-varing Parameters in Panel Models," Working Papers Series 96/11, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Ben Pelzer & Rob Eisinga & Philip Franses, 2005. "“Panelizing” Repeated Cross Sections," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 155-174, April.

  9. David Bell & Felix Ritchie, "undated". "Female Earnings and Gender Differentials in Great Britain 1977-1990," Working Papers Series 96/9, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. James Coleman, 1998. "Do women earn higher returns to tenure than men? Evidence from the new earnings survey," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(2), pages 65-68.
    2. Heather Dickey, 2007. "Regional Earnings Inequality in Great Britain: Evidence from Fixed‐effects Regressions," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 21(4‐5), pages 763-787, December.
    3. James Coleman, 1998. "The effect of tenure on earnings for males: a public/private analysis," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(11), pages 707-710.

Articles

  1. Ritchie Felix, 2014. "Access to Sensitive Data: Satisfying Objectives Rather than Constraints," Journal of Official Statistics, Sciendo, vol. 30(3), pages 1-13, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Ritchie, Felix, 2017. "Spontaneous recognition: an unnecessary control on data access?," Statistics Paper Series 24, European Central Bank.
    2. Tanvi Desai & Felix Ritchie & Richard Welpton, 2016. "Five Safes: designing data access for research," Working Papers 20161601, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    3. Felix Ritchie, 2014. "Resistance to change in government: risk, inertia and incentives," Working Papers 20141412, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.

  2. Felix Ritchie, 2008. "Secure access to confidential microdata: four years of the Virtual Microdata Laboratory," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 2(5), pages 29-34, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Bunn, Philip & Ellis, Colin, 2011. "How do individual UK consumer prices behave?," Bank of England working papers 438, Bank of England.
    2. Philip Bunn & Colin Ellis, 2012. "How do Individual UK Producer Prices Behave?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(558), pages 16-34, February.
    3. Harimohan, Rashmi, 2012. "How has the risk to inflation from inflation expectations evolved?," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 52(2), pages 114-123.
    4. Frank Dunstan & David L Fone & Myer Glickman & Stephen Palmer, 2013. "Objectively Measured Residential Environment and Self-Reported Health: A Multilevel Analysis of UK Census Data," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 8(7), pages 1-7, July.
    5. Stefan Bender, 2014. "Datenzugang in Deutschland: Der Paradigmenwechsel hat bereits stattgefunden," AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv, Springer;Deutsche Statistische Gesellschaft - German Statistical Society, vol. 8(4), pages 237-248, November.
    6. Jamie C. Moore & Peter W. F. Smith & Gabriele B. Durrant, 2018. "Correlates of record linkage and estimating risks of non‐linkage biases in business data sets," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 181(4), pages 1211-1230, October.
    7. Maule, Becky & Pugh, Alice, 2012. "Do inflation expectations currently pose a risk to the economy?," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 53(1), pages 110-121.
    8. Macallan, Clare & Taylor, Tim & O'Grady, Tom, 2011. "Assessing the risk to inflation from inflation expectations," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 51(2), pages 100-110.
    9. Philip Bunn & Colin Ellis, 2012. "Examining The Behaviour Of Individual UK Consumer Prices," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(558), pages 35-55, February.

  3. Robert Hayes & Catrin Omerod & Felix Ritchie, 2007. "Earnings: summary of sources and developments," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 1(1), pages 42-47, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Gauthier Lanot & Panos Sousounis, 2017. "The National Minimum Wage and the Substitutability Between Young and Old Workers in Low Paid Occupations," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 85(5), pages 601-633, September.
    2. Jamie C. Moore & Peter W. F. Smith & Gabriele B. Durrant, 2018. "Correlates of record linkage and estimating risks of non‐linkage biases in business data sets," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 181(4), pages 1211-1230, October.

  4. Catrin Ormerod & Felix Ritchie, 2007. "Measuring low pay: the importance of timing," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 1(4), pages 18-22, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Joanna K. Swaffield, 2014. "Minimum Wage Hikes And The Wage Growth Of Low-Wage Workers," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(4), pages 384-405, October.

  5. Catrin Ormerod & Felix Ritchie, 2007. "Issues in the measurement of low pay," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 1(6), pages 37-45, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Eid, Nourhan & Maltby, Josephine & Talavera, Oleksandr, 2016. "Income Rounding and Loan Performance in the Peer-to-Peer Market," MPRA Paper 72852, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. McVicar Duncan & Park Andrew & McGuinness Seamus, 2019. "Exploiting the Irish Border to Estimate Minimum Wage Impacts in Northern Ireland," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Sciendo & Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 8(1), pages 565-640, June.
    3. Farina, Egidio & Green, Colin P. & McVicar, Duncan, 2020. "Are Estimates of Non-Standard Employment Wage Penalties Robust to Different Wage Measures? The Case of Zero Hours Contracts in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 13548, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. D Leslie & D Blackaby & P Murphy & N OLeary, 2009. "The Employment and Earnings of Britains Senior Citizens," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 14(2), pages 1-26, September.

  6. Catrin Ormerod & Felix Ritchie, 2007. "Linking ASHE and LFS: can the main earnings sources be reconciled?," Economic & Labour Market Review, Palgrave Macmillan;Office for National Statistics, vol. 1(3), pages 24-31, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Danzer, Alexander M. & Dolton, Peter J., 2012. "Total Reward and pensions in the UK in the public and private sectors," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 584-594.
    2. Danzer, Alexander M. & Dolton, Peter, 2011. "Total Reward in the UK in the Public and Private Sectors," IZA Discussion Papers 5656, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  7. Bell, David & Ritchie, Felix, 1998. "Female earnings and gender differentials in Great Britain 1977-1994," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 331-357, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Abrar ul haq, Muhammad & Mehtab, Nadia & Khan, Tasneem, 2012. "Gender Disparity in Economic Returns to Higher Education: Evidence from Private Formal Sector of Bahawalpur (Pakistan)," MPRA Paper 62958, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2012.
    2. Stephen Morris & Matt Sutton & Hugh Gravelle & Bob Elliott & Arne Hole & Ada Ma & Bonnie Sibbald & Diane Skatun, 2008. "Determinants of General Practitioners' Wages in England," Working Papers 036cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    3. Robert ALEXANDER & Murat GENC & Mohammad JAFORULLAH, 2010. "Gender and Ethnicity in the New Zealand Labour Market," EcoMod2004 330600008, EcoMod.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-ECM: Econometrics (1) 2015-04-25
  2. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (1) 2015-01-31
  3. NEP-KNM: Knowledge Management & Knowledge Economy (1) 2014-08-28

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