IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/f/pma1628.html
   My authors  Follow this author

Chicheng Ma

Personal Details

First Name:Chicheng
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ma
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma1628
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://chichengma.weebly.com/

Affiliation

Faculty of Business and Economics
University of Hong Kong

Pokfulam, Hong Kong
http://www.fbe.hku.hk/
RePEc:edi:fbhkuhk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Ross Levine & Chen Lin & Chicheng Ma & Yuchen Xu, 2021. "The Legal Origins of Financial Development: Evidence from the Shanghai Concessions," NBER Working Papers 28794, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. James Kai‐sing Kung & Chicheng Ma, 2018. "Friends with Benefits: How Political Connections Help to Sustain Private Enterprise Growth in China," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 85(337), pages 41-74, January.
  2. Kung, James Kai-sing & Ma, Chicheng, 2014. "Autarky and the Rise and Fall of Piracy in Ming China," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(2), pages 509-534, June.
  3. Kung, James Kai-sing & Ma, Chicheng, 2014. "Can cultural norms reduce conflicts? Confucianism and peasant rebellions in Qing China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 132-149.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. James Kai‐sing Kung & Chicheng Ma, 2018. "Friends with Benefits: How Political Connections Help to Sustain Private Enterprise Growth in China," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 85(337), pages 41-74, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Ling Huang & Haiyue Liu & Jack Hou & Fulong Xiao, 2022. "Long‐term financing effects of Chinese non‐SOEs Belt and Road OFDI," Accounting and Finance, Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 62(S1), pages 1819-1850, April.
    2. Chengrui Xiao, 2020. "Intergovernmental revenue relations, tax enforcement and tax shifting: evidence from China," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 27(1), pages 128-152, February.
    3. Zhang, Yi & Liu, Chun, 2021. "Religion and unproductive entrepreneurship: The role of risk aversion," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 70(C).
    4. Dong, Zhiqiang & Wang, Xiaobing & Zhang, Tianhua & Zhong, Yuejun, 2022. "The effects of local government leadership turnover on entrepreneurial behavior," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 71(C).
    5. Zhang, Yi & Liu, Chun & Wang, Ting, 2020. "Direct or indirect? The impact of political connections on export mode of Chinese private enterprises," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 61(C).
    6. Lan, Xiaohuan & Li, Wei, 2018. "Swiss watch cycles: Evidence of corruption during leadership transition in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 1234-1252.
    7. Peng Xu & Guiyu Bai, 2019. "Board Governance, Sustainable Innovation Capability and Corporate Expansion: Empirical Data from Private Listed Companies in China," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 11(13), pages 1-17, June.
    8. , Stone Center & Yang, Li & Novokmet, Filip & Milanovic, Branko, 2020. "From Workers to Capitalists in Less Than Two Generations: A Study of Chinese Urban Elite Transformation Between 1988 and 2013," SocArXiv enbxv, Center for Open Science.
    9. Shuangyan Li & Anum Shahzadi & Mingbo Zheng & Chun-Ping Chang, 2022. "The impacts of executives’ political connections on interactions between firm’s mergers, acquisitions, and performance," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 55(2), pages 653-679, May.
    10. Santiago Barraza & Martín A. Rossi & Christian A. Ruzzier, 2021. "Sleeping with the Enemy: The Perils of Having the Government On(the)board," Working Papers 149, Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia, revised Dec 2021.
    11. Zhao Wang & Xiaobing Liu & Qinhua Liu, 2019. "Study of the Relationship between Political Connections and Corporate Re-Entrepreneurial Performance," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 11(15), pages 1-28, July.

  2. Kung, James Kai-sing & Ma, Chicheng, 2014. "Autarky and the Rise and Fall of Piracy in Ming China," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(2), pages 509-534, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Shuo Chen & James Kung, 2016. "Of maize and men: the effect of a New World crop on population and economic growth in China," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 71-99, March.
    2. Qiang Chen & Yijiang Wang & Chun-lei Yang, 2014. "Taxation under Autocracy: Theory and Evidence from Late Imperial China," SDU Working Papers 2014-03, School of Economics, Shandong University.
    3. Mitchener, Kris James & Ma, Debin, 2016. "Introduction to the special issue: a new economic history of China," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 69191, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

  3. Kung, James Kai-sing & Ma, Chicheng, 2014. "Can cultural norms reduce conflicts? Confucianism and peasant rebellions in Qing China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 132-149.

    Cited by:

    1. Lopez-Uribe, Maria del Pilar & Castells-Quintana, David & McDermott, Thomas K. J., 2017. "Geography, institutions and development: a review ofthe long-run impacts of climate change," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 65147, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Marshall Burke & Solomon M. Hsiang & Edward Miguel, 2014. "Climate and Conflict," NBER Working Papers 20598, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Xue, Melanie Meng, 2018. "High-Value Work and the Rise of Women: The Cotton Revolution and Gender Equality in China," MPRA Paper 91100, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. David Castells-Quintana & Maria del Pilar Lopez-Uribe & Tom McDermott, 2015. "Climate change and the geographical and institutional drivers of economic development," GRI Working Papers 198, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    5. Shuo Chen & James Kung, 2016. "Of maize and men: the effect of a New World crop on population and economic growth in China," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 71-99, March.
    6. Jiwei Qian & Tuan‐Hwee Sng, 2021. "The state in Chinese economic history," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 61(3), pages 359-395, November.
    7. Chen, Shihua & Ye, Yan & Jia, Fei & Wang, Chengqi, 2022. "Accounting for the role of culture in board directors’ dissent," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 61(C).
    8. Iyigun, Murat & Nunn, Nathan & Qian, Nancy, 2017. "Winter is Coming: The Long-Run Effects of Climate Change on Conflict, 1400-1900," CEPR Discussion Papers 11760, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Liu, Haiming & Chiang, Yao-Min, 2022. "Confucianism and IPO underpricing," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 71(C).
    10. Camille Laville, 2018. "The econometrical causal analysis of internal conflicts: The evolutions of a growing literature [L’analyse économétrique des conflits internes par l’approche causale : les évolutions d’une littérat," Working Papers hal-01940461, HAL.
    11. Xunan Feng & Zhi Jin & Anders C. Johansson, 2021. "How beliefs influence behaviour: Confucianism and innovation in China," Economics of Transition and Institutional Change, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 29(3), pages 501-525, July.
    12. Fenske, James & Kala, Namrata, 2017. "1807: Economic shocks, conflict and the slave trade," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 66-76.
    13. Junhong Chu & Haoming Liu & I. P. L. Png, 2018. "Nonlabor Income and Age at Marriage: Evidence From China’s Heating Policy," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 55(6), pages 2345-2370, December.
    14. Dincecco, Mark & Wang, Yuhua, 2018. "Internal Conflict, Elite Action, and State Failure: Evidence from China, 1000-1911," MPRA Paper 87777, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Camille Laville, 2018. "The econometrical causal analysis of internal conflicts: The evolutions of a growing literature [L’analyse économétrique des conflits internes par l’approche causale : les évolutions d’une littérat," CERDI Working papers hal-01940461, HAL.
    16. Jian Yang & Chaohua Dong & Yongjin Chen, 2021. "Government’s Economic Performance Fosters Trust in Government in China: Assessing the Moderating Effect of Respect for Authority," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 154(2), pages 545-558, April.
    17. Qing Wan & Xiaoke Cheng & Kam C. Chan & Shenghao Gao, 2021. "Born to innovate? The birth‐order effect of CEOs on corporate innovation," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(9-10), pages 1846-1888, October.
    18. Miao, Meng & Niu, Guanjie & Noe, Thomas, 2021. "Contracting without contracting institutions: The trusted assistant loan in 19th century China," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 140(3), pages 987-1007.
    19. Cornelius Christian & James Fenske, 2015. "Economic shocks and unrest in French West Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 2015-01, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    20. Yan, Youliang & Xu, Xixiong & Lai, Jieji, 2021. "Does Confucian culture influence corporate R&D investment? Evidence from Chinese private firms," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 40(C).
    21. Boxell, Levi, 2016. "A Drought-Induced African Slave Trade?," MPRA Paper 69853, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    22. Danli Wang & Yixin Yang, 2021. "Sexual freedom and family ties: Evidence from China's ethnic minorities," Economics of Transition and Institutional Change, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 29(3), pages 459-500, July.
    23. James Alm & Weizheng Lai & Xun Li, 2021. "Housing Market Regulations and Strategic Divorce Propensity in China," Working Papers 2119, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    24. Chen Feng & Beibei Shi & Ming Xu, 2020. "The political origin of differences in long-term economic prosperity: centralization versus decentralization," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 14(3), pages 581-639, September.
    25. Fan, Yunqi & Xu, Zijing, 2022. "Audit firm's Confucianism and stock price crash risk: Evidence from China," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 79(C).
    26. Lei Chen & Zhi Jin & Yongqiang Ma & Hui Xu, 2019. "Confucianism, openness to the West, and corporate investment efficiency," European Financial Management, European Financial Management Association, vol. 25(3), pages 554-590, June.
    27. Koyama, Mark & Xue, Melanie Meng, 2015. "The Literary Inquisition: The Persecution of Intellectuals and Human Capital Accumulation in China," MPRA Paper 62103, University Library of Munich, Germany.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-FDG: Financial Development & Growth (1) 2021-05-24. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2021-05-24. Author is listed

Corrections

All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. For general information on how to correct material on RePEc, see these instructions.

To update listings or check citations waiting for approval, Chicheng Ma should log into the RePEc Author Service.

To make corrections to the bibliographic information of a particular item, find the technical contact on the abstract page of that item. There, details are also given on how to add or correct references and citations.

To link different versions of the same work, where versions have a different title, use this form. Note that if the versions have a very similar title and are in the author's profile, the links will usually be created automatically.

Please note that most corrections can take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.