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Chicheng Ma

Personal Details

First Name:Chicheng
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ma
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma1628
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://chichengma.weebly.com/

Affiliation

Faculty of Business and Economics
University of Hong Kong

Pokfulam, Hong Kong
http://www.fbe.hku.hk/

: (852) 2241 5343
(852) 2549 3735
7th Floor, Meng Wah Complex, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong
RePEc:edi:fbhkuhk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Kung, James Kai-sing & Ma, Chicheng, 2014. "Autarky and the Rise and Fall of Piracy in Ming China," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(02), pages 509-534, June.
  2. Kung, James Kai-sing & Ma, Chicheng, 2014. "Can cultural norms reduce conflicts? Confucianism and peasant rebellions in Qing China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 132-149.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Kung, James Kai-sing & Ma, Chicheng, 2014. "Autarky and the Rise and Fall of Piracy in Ming China," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(02), pages 509-534, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Shuo Chen & James Kung, 2016. "Of maize and men: the effect of a New World crop on population and economic growth in China," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 71-99, March.
    2. Qiang Chen & Yijiang Wang & Chun-lei Yang, 2014. "Taxation under Autocracy: Theory and Evidence from Late Imperial China," SDU Working Papers 2014-03, School of Economics, Shandong University.

  2. Kung, James Kai-sing & Ma, Chicheng, 2014. "Can cultural norms reduce conflicts? Confucianism and peasant rebellions in Qing China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 132-149.

    Cited by:

    1. Lopez-Uribe, Maria del Pilar & Castells-Quintana, David & McDermott, Thomas K. J., 2017. "Geography, institutions and development: a review ofthe long-run impacts of climate change," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 65147, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Marshall Burke & Solomon M. Hsiang & Edward Miguel, 2014. "Climate and Conflict," NBER Working Papers 20598, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. David Castells-Quintana & Maria del Pilar Lopez-Uribe & Tom McDermott, 2015. "Climate change and the geographical and institutional drivers of economic development," GRI Working Papers 198, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
    4. Shuo Chen & James Kung, 2016. "Of maize and men: the effect of a New World crop on population and economic growth in China," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 71-99, March.
    5. Iyigun, Murat & Nunn, Nathan & Qian, Nancy, 2017. "Winter is Coming: The Long-Run Effects of Climate Change on Conflict, 1400-1900," CEPR Discussion Papers 11760, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Fenske, James & Kala, Namrata, 2017. "1807: Economic shocks, conflict and the slave trade," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 66-76.
    7. Cornelius Christian & James Fenske, 2015. "Economic shocks and unrest in French West Africa," CSAE Working Paper Series 2015-01, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

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