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1807: Economic shocks, conflict and the slave trade

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  • James Fenske
  • Namrata Kala

Abstract

Suppression of the slave trade after 1807 increased the incidence of conflict between Africans. We use geo-coded data on African conflicts to uncover a discontinuous increase in conflict after 1807 in areas affected by the slave trade. In West Africa, the slave trade declined. This empowered interests that rivaled existing authorities, and political leaders resorted to violence in order to maintain their influence. In West-Central and South-East Africa, slave exports increased after 1807 and were produced through violence. We validate our explanation using Southwestern Nigeria and Eastern South Africa as examples.

Suggested Citation

  • James Fenske & Namrata Kala, 2014. "1807: Economic shocks, conflict and the slave trade," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-02, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  • Handle: RePEc:csa:wpaper:2014-02
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Graziella Bertocchi, 2016. "The legacies of slavery in and out of Africa," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-19, December.
    2. Jevan Cherniwchan & Juan Moreno-Cruz, 2018. "Maize and Precolonial Africa," CESifo Working Paper Series 7018, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Graziella Bertocchi, 2016. "The Legacies of Slavery in and out of Africa," Department of Economics 0096, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    4. Mark Dincecco & James Fenske & Massimiliano Gaetano Onorato, 2014. "Is Africa Different? Historical Conflict and State Development," CSAE Working Paper Series 2014-35, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    5. Fenske, James & Kala, Namrata, 2015. "Climate and the slave trade," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 19-32.

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