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Chloe N. East

Personal Details

First Name:Chloe
Middle Name:N.
Last Name:East
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pea23
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.chloeneast.com/

Affiliation

(95%) Economics Department
University of Colorado Denver

Denver, Colorado (United States)
http://econ.ucdenver.edu/home/
RePEc:edi:edcudus (more details at EDIRC)

(5%) Institute of Labor Economics (IZA)

Bonn, Germany
http://www.iza.org/
RePEc:edi:izaaade (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Chloe N. East & David Simon, 2020. "How Well Insured are Job Losers? Efficacy of the Public Safety Net," NBER Working Papers 28218, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. East, Chloe N. & Velasquez, Andrea, 2018. "The Effect of Increasing Immigration Enforcement on the Labor Supply of High-Skilled Citizen Women," IZA Discussion Papers 12029, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  3. East, Chloe N. & Friedson, Andrew I., 2018. "An Apple a Day? Adult Food Stamp Eligibility and Health Care Utilization Among Immigrants," IZA Discussion Papers 11445, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  4. East, Chloe N. & Luck, Philip & Mansour, Hani & Velasquez, Andrea, 2018. "The Labor Market Effects of Immigration Enforcement," IZA Discussion Papers 11486, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  5. Chloe N. East & Sarah Miller & Marianne Page & Laura R. Wherry, 2017. "Multi-generational Impacts of Childhood Access to the Safety Net: Early Life Exposure to Medicaid and the Next Generation’s Health," NBER Working Papers 23810, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Articles

  1. Chloe N. East, 2020. "The Effect of Food Stamps on Children’s Health: Evidence from Immigrants’ Changing Eligibility," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 55(2), pages 387-427.
  2. Chloe N. East & Andrew I. Friedson, 2020. "An Apple A Day?," American Journal of Health Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(3), pages 289-323.
  3. East, Chloe N., 2018. "Immigrants’ labor supply response to Food Stamp access," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 202-226.
  4. East, Chloe N. & Kuka, Elira, 2015. "Reexamining the consumption smoothing benefits of Unemployment Insurance," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 32-50.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Chloe N. East & David Simon, 2020. "How Well Insured are Job Losers? Efficacy of the Public Safety Net," NBER Working Papers 28218, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Martti Kaila & Emily Nix & Krista Riukula, 2021. "Disparate Impacts of Job Loss by Parental Income and Implications for Intergenerational Mobility," Opportunity and Inclusive Growth Institute Working Papers 53, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    2. Elira Kuka & Bryan Stuart, 2022. "Racial Inequality in Unemployment Insurance Receipt and Take-Up," Working Papers 22-09, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    3. Brad Hershbein & Bryan Stuart, 2022. "Place-Based Consequences of Person-Based Transfer: Evidence from Recessions," Working Papers 22-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    4. Afridi, Farzana & Mahajan, Kanika & Sangwan, Nikita, 2021. "Employment Guaranteed? Social Protection during a Pandemic," IZA Discussion Papers 14099, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Brah J. Hershbein & Bryan A. Stuart, 2022. "Place-Based Consequences of Person-Based Transfers: Evidence from Recessions," Upjohn Working Papers 22-362, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

  2. East, Chloe N. & Velasquez, Andrea, 2018. "The Effect of Increasing Immigration Enforcement on the Labor Supply of High-Skilled Citizen Women," IZA Discussion Papers 12029, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Dicarlo, Emanuele, 2022. "How Do Firms Adjust to Negative Labor Supply Shocks? Evidence from Migration Outflows," IZA Discussion Papers 14994, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Emanuele Dicarlo, 2022. "How do firms adjust to a negative labor supply shock? Evidence form migration outflows," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1361, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

  3. East, Chloe N. & Luck, Philip & Mansour, Hani & Velasquez, Andrea, 2018. "The Labor Market Effects of Immigration Enforcement," IZA Discussion Papers 11486, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Jongkwan Lee & Giovanni Peri & Vasil Yasenov, 2019. "The Labor Market Effects of Mexican Repatriations: Longitudinal Evidence from the 1930s," NBER Working Papers 26399, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Dicarlo, Emanuele, 2022. "How Do Firms Adjust to Negative Labor Supply Shocks? Evidence from Migration Outflows," IZA Discussion Papers 14994, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Arenas-Arroyo, Esther & Wang, Chunbei, 2020. "Is immigration enforcement shaping immigrant marriage patterns?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 190(C).
    4. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Bucheli, Jose R., 2020. "Immigration Policy and Hispanics' Willingness to Run for Office," IZA Discussion Papers 13698, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Otsu, Yuki, 2021. "Sanctuary cities and crime," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 192(C), pages 600-615.
    6. Churchill, Brandyn F. & Dickinson, Andrew & Mackay, Taylor & Sabia, Joseph J., 2019. "The Effect of E-Verify Laws on Crime," IZA Discussion Papers 12798, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Marcella Alsan & Crystal Yang, 2018. "Fear and the Safety Net: Evidence from Secure Communities," NBER Working Papers 24731, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Shalise Ayromloo & Benjamin Feigenberg & Darren Lubotsky, 2020. "States Taking the Reins? Employment Verification Requirements and Local Labor Market Outcomes," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 2004, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    9. Amanda M. Grittner & Matthew S. Johnson, 2021. "When Labor Enforcement and Immigration Enforcement Collide: Deterring Worker Complaints Worsens Workplace Safety," Upjohn Working Papers 21-353, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    10. Kovak, Brian K. & Lessem, Rebecca, 2020. "How do U.S. visa policies affect unauthorized immigration?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 92-108.
    11. East, Chloe N. & Velasquez, Andrea, 2018. "The Effect of Increasing Immigration Enforcement on the Labor Supply of High-Skilled Citizen Women," IZA Discussion Papers 12029, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. Emanuele Dicarlo, 2022. "How do firms adjust to a negative labor supply shock? Evidence form migration outflows," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1361, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    13. Brian K. Kovak & Rebecca Lessem, 2020. "How do U.S. Visa Policies Affect Unauthorized Immigration?," NBER Working Papers 26790, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Antman, Francisca M., 2021. "De Facto Immigration Enforcement, ICE Raid Awareness, and Worker Engagement," IZA Discussion Papers 14646, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  4. Chloe N. East & Sarah Miller & Marianne Page & Laura R. Wherry, 2017. "Multi-generational Impacts of Childhood Access to the Safety Net: Early Life Exposure to Medicaid and the Next Generation’s Health," NBER Working Papers 23810, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Ahsan, Md Nazmul & Maharaj, Riddhi, 2018. "Parental human capital and child health at birth in India," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 130-149.
    2. Cygan-Rehm, Kamila & Karbownik, Krzysztof, 2020. "The Effects of Incentivizing Early Prenatal Care on Infant Health," IZA Discussion Papers 13874, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Rodriguez Takeuchi,Laura Kiku, 2020. "Violence and Newborn Health : Estimates for Colombia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9377, The World Bank.
    4. Libertad González & Sofia Trommlerová, 2021. "Prenatal Transfers and Infant Health: Evidence from Spain," Working Papers 1261, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    5. Colmer, Jonathan & Voorheis, John, 2020. "The grandkids aren't alright: the intergenerational effects of prenatal pollution exposure," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 108495, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Hilary W. Hoynes & Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach, 2018. "Safety Nets Investments in Children," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 49(1 (Spring), pages 89-150.
    7. Libertad González Luna & Sofia Trommlerová, 2021. "Prenatal transfers and infant health: Evidence from Spain," Economics Working Papers 1783, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    8. Bhashkar Mazumder & Maria Fernanda Rosales & Margaret Triyana, 2019. "Social Interventions, Health and Wellbeing: The Long-Term and Intergenerational Effects of a School Construction Program," Working Paper Series WP-2019-09, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    9. Nobles, Jenna & Hamoudi, Amar, 2019. "Detecting the Effects of Early-Life Exposures: Why Fecundity Matters," SocArXiv x4zm6, Center for Open Science.

Articles

  1. Chloe N. East, 2020. "The Effect of Food Stamps on Children’s Health: Evidence from Immigrants’ Changing Eligibility," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 55(2), pages 387-427.

    Cited by:

    1. Kamble, Vaibhav, 2021. "Health Returns to Birth Weight: Evidence from Developing Countries," MPRA Paper 105150, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Libertad González & Sofia Trommlerová, 2021. "Prenatal Transfers and Infant Health: Evidence from Spain," Working Papers 1261, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    3. Hilary W. Hoynes & Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach, 2018. "Safety Nets Investments in Children," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 49(1 (Spring), pages 89-150.
    4. Jacob Goldin & Elaine Maag & Katherine Michelmore, 2021. "Estimating the Net Fiscal Cost of a Child Tax Credit Expansion," NBER Chapters, in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 36, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Xiaoning Huang & Neeraj Kaushal & Julia Shu-Huah Wang, 2021. "What Explains the Gap in Welfare Use Among Immigrants and Natives?," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 40(4), pages 819-860, August.
    6. Marcella Alsan & Crystal Yang, 2018. "Fear and the Safety Net: Evidence from Secure Communities," NBER Working Papers 24731, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Amuedo-Dorantes, Catalina & Churchill, Brandyn F. & Song, Yang, 2020. "Immigration Enforcement and Infant Health," IZA Discussion Papers 13908, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Brandyn Churchill, 2021. "E‐Verify mandates and unauthorized immigrants' health insurance coverage," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 88(2), pages 487-526, October.
    9. Libertad González Luna & Sofia Trommlerová, 2021. "Prenatal transfers and infant health: Evidence from Spain," Economics Working Papers 1783, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    10. Xiaoning Huang & Neeraj Kaushal & Julia Shu-Huah Wang, 2020. "What Explains the Gap in Welfare Use among Immigrants and Natives?," NBER Working Papers 27811, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  2. Chloe N. East & Andrew I. Friedson, 2020. "An Apple A Day?," American Journal of Health Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(3), pages 289-323.

    Cited by:

    1. Colin Gray & Adam Leive & Elena Prager & Kelsey B. Pukelis & Mary Zaki, 2021. "Employed in a SNAP? The Impact of Work Requirements on Program Participation and Labor Supply," NBER Working Papers 28877, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

  3. East, Chloe N., 2018. "Immigrants’ labor supply response to Food Stamp access," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 202-226.

    Cited by:

    1. Dias, Felipe A & Chance, Joseph, 2021. "COVID-19, Public Charge Rules, and Immigrant Employment in the United States," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt37f8w4sf, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
    2. Laird, Jennifer & Santelli, Isaac & Waldfogel, Jane & Wimer, Christopher, 2018. "Forgoing Food Assistance out of Fear: Simulating the Child Poverty Impact of a Making SNAP a Legal Liability for Immigrants," SocArXiv 6sgpk, Center for Open Science.
    3. Martha J. Bailey & Hilary W. Hoynes & Maya Rossin-Slater & Reed Walker, 2020. "Is the Social Safety Net a Long-Term Investment? Large-Scale Evidence from the Food Stamps Program," NBER Working Papers 26942, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Xu, Licheng, 2020. "Timing of SNAP disbursement and crime rate in the United States," 2020 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, Kansas City, Missouri 304248, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Han, Jeehoon, 2022. "The impact of SNAP work requirements on labor supply," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(C).
    6. Bratsberg, Bernt & Raaum, Oddbjørn & Røed, Knut, 2020. "Immigrant Responses to Social Insurance Generosity," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).
    7. Joel Cuffey & Timothy K. M. Beatty & Elton Mykerezi, 2022. "Work Effort and Work Requirements for Food Assistance among U.S. Adults," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 104(1), pages 294-317, January.
    8. Deiana, Claudio & Geraci, Andrea & Mazzarella, Gianluca & Sabatini, Fabio, 2021. "COVID-19 Relief Programs and Compliance with Confinement Measures," IZA Discussion Papers 14064, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Jiyoon (June) Kim & Matthew P Rabbitt & Charlotte Tuttle, 2020. "Changes in Low‐Income Households’ Spending and Time Use Patterns in Response to the 2013 Sunset of the ARRA‐SNAP Benefit," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 42(4), pages 777-795, December.

  4. East, Chloe N. & Kuka, Elira, 2015. "Reexamining the consumption smoothing benefits of Unemployment Insurance," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 32-50.

    Cited by:

    1. Elira Kuka, 2018. "Quantifying the Benefits of Social Insurance: Unemployment Insurance and Health," Departmental Working Papers 1808, Southern Methodist University, Department of Economics.
    2. Isaac Swensen & Jason M. Lindo & Krishna Regmi, 2020. "Stable Income, Stable Family," NBER Working Papers 27753, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Elira Kuka & Bryan Stuart, 2022. "Racial Inequality in Unemployment Insurance Receipt and Take-Up," Working Papers 22-09, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    4. Givens, Gregory, 2019. "Unemployment, Partial Insurance, and the Multiplier Effects of Government Spending," MPRA Paper 96811, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Kirill Borusyak & Peter Hull, 2020. "Non-Random Exposure to Exogenous Shocks: Theory and Applications," Working Papers 2020-130, Becker Friedman Institute for Research In Economics.
    6. Peter Ganong & Pascal J. Noel, 2019. "Consumer Spending During Unemployment: Positive and Normative Implications," NBER Working Papers 25417, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Zhang, Guangli, 2021. "The Effect of Unemployment Benefit Pay Frequency on UI Claimants' Job Search Behaviors," Working Papers 21-3, Sinquefield Center for Applied Economic Research, Saint Louis University.
    8. Fos, Vyacheslav & Hamdi, Naser & Kalda, Ankit & Nickerson, Jordan, 2019. "Gig-Labor: Trading Safety Nets for Steering Wheels," CEPR Discussion Papers 13885, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Edwards Kathryn Anne, 2020. "Who helps the unemployed? Workers’ receipt of public and private transfers," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Sciendo & Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 9(1), pages 1-26, March.
    10. Abdulkarim M. Meraya & Nilanjana Dwibedi & Xi Tan & Kim Innes & Sophie Mitra & Usha Sambamoorthi, 2018. "The dynamic relationships between economic status and health measures among working‐age adults in the United States," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(8), pages 1160-1174, August.
    11. Kim, Jiwoon, 2018. "The Effect of Enhancing Unemployment Benefits in Korea: Wage Replacement Rate vs. Maximum Benefit Duration," KDI Journal of Economic Policy, Korea Development Institute (KDI), vol. 40(3), pages 1-44.
    12. Jessamyn Schaller & Chase Eck, 2019. "Adverse Life Events and Intergenerational Transfers," Upjohn Working Papers 19-309, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    13. Francesco D'Amuri & Juri Marcucci, 2012. "The predictive power of Google searches in forecasting unemployment," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 891, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    14. Nathaniel Pattison, 2017. "Consumption Smoothing and Debtor Protections," Departmental Working Papers 1703, Southern Methodist University, Department of Economics.
    15. Moein Mirani Ahangarkolaei & Eser Demir & Tolga Constantinou & Mostafa Toranji & Tadashi Adino & Nasrin Tavassoli & Atefeh Noghani, 2021. "The Buffering Effects of Social Insurance for the Spread of Covid-19," Information Management and Business Review, AMH International, vol. 12(4), pages 19-27.
    16. Elira Kuka, 2020. "Quantifying the Benefits of Social Insurance: Unemployment Insurance and Health," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 102(3), pages 490-505, July.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (4) 2017-10-01 2018-04-30 2019-01-28 2021-02-08. Author is listed
  2. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (3) 2017-10-01 2018-04-30 2019-01-28. Author is listed
  3. NEP-INT: International Trade (2) 2018-05-28 2019-01-21. Author is listed
  4. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2018-05-28 2021-02-08. Author is listed
  5. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (2) 2018-05-28 2019-01-21. Author is listed
  6. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (1) 2019-01-21
  7. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2021-02-08
  8. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2018-05-28

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